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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Attachment of Escherichia Coli O157:h7, Salmonella Typhimurium, and Listeria Monocytogenes to Beef and Inactivation Using Hydrodynamic Pressure Processing

Authors
item Patel, Jitu
item Solomon, Morse

Submitted to: International Society for Optical Engineering
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: November 7, 2005
Publication Date: December 12, 2005
Citation: Patel, J.R., Solomon, M.B. 2005. Attachment of Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella typhimurium, and Listeria monocytogenes to beef and inactivation using hydrodynamic pressure processing. Proceedings of International Society for Optical Engineering, 5996: 59961E1:E6.

Interpretive Summary: Bacterial attachment to meat surface is the first step in meat contamination. When pathogenic bacteria attach to the meat surface, it creates a potential threat to consumers if they are consumed without any terminal inactivation treatment. Bacteria attachment occurs as a two stage process: reversible (loosely attached) and irreversible attachment (strongly attached). Most attachment of Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella Typhimurium, and Listeria monocytogenes to beef surface occurred within 10 min. There was no significant difference in attachment strength of pathogens during the first 30 minutes exposure time. The effect of attachment strength on inactivation of these by non-thermal hydrodynamic pressure (HDP) technology was studied. Strongly attached bacteria to beef surface were inactivated by HDP at a greater rate and the reduction was significant for all three bacteria. These findings disclose that HDP treatment is more lethal to pathogenic bacteria strongly attached to beef surface compared to those loosely attached cells.

Technical Abstract: The attachment strength of Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella Typhimurium, and Listeria monocytogenes to beef surface was evaluated. The effect of bacterial attachment strength on inactivation by HDP treatment was studied. Bacterial attachment was defined as loosely attached (analyzed first by running diluent over the beef cubes) and strongly attached (analyzed again rinsed cubes by pummeling for 2 min in diluent) to the beef surface. Most attachment of these three pathogens occurred within 10 min. There was no significant difference in attachment strength of pathogens during the first 30 minutes exposure time. Strongly attached bacteria to beef surface were inactivated by HDP at a greater rate and the reduction was significant for all three bacteria (0.52, 0.37, and 0.43 log10 CFU/g for E. coli O157:H7, S. Typhimurium, and L. monocytogenes, respectively). No clear indications were obtained for sub-lethal damage of microorganisms surviving the HDP treatment. These findings disclose that HDP treatment is more lethal to pathogenic bacteria strongly attached to beef surface compared to those planktonic or loosely attached cells.

Last Modified: 12/21/2014
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