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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Susceptibility of the peachtree borer, Synanthedon Exitiosa, to Steinernema carpocapsae and Steinernema riobrave in laboratory and field trials

Authors
item Cottrell, Ted
item Shapiro Ilan, David

Submitted to: Journal of Invertebrate Pathology
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: March 15, 2006
Publication Date: May 15, 2006
Citation: Cottrell, T.E., Shapiro Ilan, D.I. 2006. Susceptibility of the peachtree borer, Synanthedon Exitiosa, to Steinernema carpocapsae and Steinernema riobrave in laboratory and field trials. Journal of Invertebrate Pathology. 92:85-88.

Interpretive Summary: The peachtree borer is a serious pest of peach trees. Larvae of this pest attack the trunk and roots at, and just below, soil level. A single larva can cause considerable damage to a young peach tree. At present, a trunk-applied insecticide is the only control used against this pest throughout the southeastern US. We investigated the susceptibility of peachtree borer larvae to entomopathogenic nematodes and found that the nematode Steinernema carpocapsae (All strain) was significantly more effective against the peachtree borer than the nematode S. riobrave (7-12 strain). In fact, 88% control of peachtree borer larvae was obtained in the field trial with S. carpocapsae.

Technical Abstract: The peachtree borer, Synanthedon exitiosa (Lepidoptera: Sesiidae), is a serious pest of peach that attacks the trunk and roots at, and just below, soil level. At present, a trunk-applied insecticide is the only control used against this pest throughout the southeastern US. We investigated the susceptibility of peachtree borer larvae to entomopathogenic nematodes. In a field trial and a laboratory assay, the nematode Steinernema carpocapsae (All) strain was significantly more effective against the peachtree borer than S. riobrave (7-12) strain. In fact, 88% control of peachtree borer larvae was obtained in the field trial with S. carpocapsae.

Last Modified: 7/30/2014
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