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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: EVALUATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF EXOTIC PLANT PATHOGENS FOR BIOLOGICAL CONTROL OF INTRODUCED, INVASIVE WEEDS

Location: Foreign Disease-Weed Science

Title: Enchancing Incidence of Puccinia Punctiformis, Through Mowing, to Improve Management of Canada Thistle (Cirsium Arvense)

Authors
item Demers, A - PENNSYLVANIA STATE UNIV.
item Berner, Dana
item Backman, P - PENNSYLVANIA STATE UNIV.

Submitted to: Biological Control
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: November 13, 2006
Publication Date: November 13, 2006
Citation: Demers, A.M., Berner, D.K., Backman, P.A. 2006. Enchancing incidence of puccinia punctiformis, through mowing, to improve management of canada thistle (cirsium arvense). Biological Control 39 (2006) 481-488

Interpretive Summary: Biological control of Canada thistle using a native rust fungus, has been largely unsuccessful in large part due to poor distribution of spores in the soil, leading to a low incidence of systemically infected shoots. The present study investigated the effects of mowing Canada thistle patches, containing plant shoots infected by this fungus, on development of disease over time. Mid-season mowing enhanced dispersal of infected plant parts bearing spores which lead to a greater proportion of infected shoots in experimental plots. Late season mowing provided highest levels of disease early the next summer. It is proposed that mower based dispersal of spores followed by re-growth of infected shoots may help enhance incidence of this disease to achieve biological control.

Technical Abstract: Biological control of Canada thistle using P. punctiformis, has been largely unsuccessful in large part due to a heterogeneous distribution of teliospores in the soil leading to a low incidence of systemically infected shoots. The present study investigated the effects of mowing Canada thistle patches, containing shoots systemically infected by P. punctiformis, on development of disease over time. Mid-season mowing enhanced dispersal of systemically infected plant parts bearing urediniospores and teliospores leading to a greater proportion of systemically infected shoots in experimental plots observed at seasons end. Late season mowing provided highest levels of disease early the next summer. It is proposed that mower based dispersal of teliospores and removal of apical dominance followed by re-growth of systemically infected shoots may help overcome the monocyclic nature of the pathogen and enhance incidence of this disease to achieve biological control.

Last Modified: 9/10/2014
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