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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Collecting Legumes in the Largest Remote Region Remaining in the Lower 48 States.

Author
item Greene, Stephanie

Submitted to: Bulletin of the Desert Legume Program of the Boyce Thompson Southwestern Arboretum and the University of Arizona
Publication Type: Popular Publication
Publication Acceptance Date: March 10, 2005
Publication Date: April 11, 2005
Citation: Greene S.L., 2005. Collecting Legumes In The Largest Remote Region Remaining In The Lower 48 States. Aridus 17(1):1-5.

Interpretive Summary: This article reports on a 2004 germplasm-collecting trip to the Owyhee Uplands, in Oregon, U.S. Our objectives were three-fold. We were interested in collecting seed from common legume species that may prove to be useful in wild land revegetation efforts. We were also interested in obtaining seed samples of rare endemic legume species for ex situ conservation (ex situ means conservation outside of the native habitat, such as storing seed in a gene bank). Our third objective was to field-test a mobile wireless GPS/GIS data collection system. We collected at total of 56 accessions, 37 accessions of common species and 19 accessions of rare species. Seed is housed at the WRPIS germplasm repository, and is available for distribution for research and breeding purposes.

Technical Abstract: Outside of Alaska, the Owyhee Uplands is considered by some to be the largest remaining wild region in the United States. Endemic legume species include Astragalus camptopus, A. sterilis, A. mulfordiae, Lupinus biddlei, Peteria thompsoniae, Trifolium leibergii, and T. owyheense. More common legumes include: Astragalus eremiticus, A. lentiginosus and A. purshii. In 2004, we made a germplasm-collecting trip to the region. Our objectives were three-fold. We were interested in collecting seed from common legume species that may prove to be useful in wild land revegetation efforts. We were also interested in obtaining seed samples of rare endemic legume species for ex situ conservation. Our third objective was to field-test a mobile wireless GPS/GIS data collection system. We collected at total of 56 accessions, 37 accessions of common species and 19 accessions of rare species. Seed is housed at the WRPIS germplasm repository, and is available for distribution for research and breeding purposes.

Last Modified: 11/25/2014
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