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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Gene Mapping

Author
item Rohrer, Gary

Submitted to: Encyclopedia of Animal Science
Publication Type: Book / Chapter
Publication Acceptance Date: July 4, 2004
Publication Date: January 4, 2005
Citation: Rohrer, G.A. 2005. Gene mapping. Encyclopedia of Animal Science. Marcel Dekker, Inc., NY. Wilson G. Pond & Alan W. Bell (eds.). p. 459-462.

Interpretive Summary: Gene mapping is the science of determining the location of a gene in a species' genome. The genome of most mammalian species is comprised of approximately three billion bases of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) contained in 18-35 separate linear molecules (chromosomes). Mammals are diploid organisms so each cell possess two copies of the genome in the nucleus, one copy that was contributed by the father and the other copy contributed by the mother. A common analogy is that a gene map is the "road map of life". Road maps are a depiction of long segments of concrete known as roads and locations on the roads that represent cities. While the units of measure for a road map is often in miles or kilometers, different units of measurement are used for gene maps based on the type of map that is presented. Two types of gene maps commonly used in genetics are Genetic Maps (or Linkage Maps) and Physical Maps. Both maps depict the linear order of genes as they are located on the chromosome.

Technical Abstract: Gene mapping is the science of determining the location of a gene in a species' genome. The genome of most mammalian species is comprised of approximately three billion bases of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) contained in 18-35 separate linear molecules (chromosomes). Mammals are diploid organisms so each cell possess two copies of the genome in the nucleus, one copy that was contributed by the father and the other copy contributed by the mother. A common analogy is that a gene map is the "road map of life". Road maps are a depiction of long segments of concrete known as roads and locations on the roads that represent cities. While the units of measure for a road map is often in miles or kilometers, different units of measurement are used for gene maps based on the type of map that is presented. Two types of gene maps commonly used in genetics are Genetic Maps (or Linkage Maps) and Physical Maps. Both maps depict the linear order of genes as they are located on the chromosome.

Last Modified: 10/23/2014