Page Banner

United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Pulmonary Dendritic Cells Isolated from Neonatal and Adult Ovine Lung Tissue

Authors
item Fach, Sasha - IOWA STATE UNIVERSITY
item BROCKMEIER, SUSAN
item Hobbs, Lea
item Lehmkuhl, Howard
item SACCO, RANDY

Submitted to: Veterinary Immunology and Immunopathology
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: February 15, 2006
Publication Date: April 16, 2006
Citation: Fach, S.J., Brockmeier, S., Hobbs, L.A., Lehmkuhl, H.D., Sacco, R.E. 2006. Pulmonary dendritic cells isolated from neonatal and adult ovine lung tissue. Veterinary Immunology and Immunopathology. 112(3-4):171-82.

Interpretive Summary: Here, we isolated and identified lung dendritic cells (DCs) in both neonatal and adult sheep. Neonatal lung DCs exhibited characteristic morphology when observed by electron microscopy. Regardless of age, lung DCs were functionally able to take up antigen but to a lesser degree than monocyte-derived DCs. In addition, lung DCs were demonstrated to be potent stimulators of T cells. Neonatal and adult lung DCs exhibited characteristics of immature DCs but were functionally more similar to mature DCs. These data represent the first characterization of neonatal lung DCs. Further studies of these cells in respiratory disease models should contribute to a better understanding of neonatal susceptibility to certain infections.

Technical Abstract: Lung dendritic cells (DCs) are potent antigen presenting cells (APCs) that initiate and modulate the adaptive immune response upon microbial infection within the pulmonary environment. Adult lung DCs have been characterized, although there is a lack of data regarding neonatal lung DCs. Here, we isolated and identified lung DCs in both neonatal and adult sheep. We utilized a purification method of magnetic activated cell sorting that resulted in selection of CD11c+ DCs from enzymatically digested ovine lungs. Neonatal lung DCs exhibited characteristic dendrites and morphology when observed by transmission electron microscopy and expressed low to moderate DEC-205, CD86, MHC class II and CD14. Regardless of age, lung DCs were functionally able to endocytose FITC conjugated ovalbumin but to a lesser degree than monocyte-derived DCs. In addition, lung DCs were demonstrated to be potent stimulators of allogeneic T cell proliferation. Neonatal and adult lung DCs exhibited phenotypic characteristics of immature DCs but were functionally more similar to mature DCs. These data represent the first characterization of neonatal lung DCs. Further studies of these APCs in respiratory disease models should contribute to a better understanding of neonatal susceptibility to certain infections.

Last Modified: 9/10/2014
Footer Content Back to Top of Page