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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Volatile Constituents and Character Impact Compound of Florida’s Tropical Fruit

Authors
item Mahattanatawee, Kanjana
item Goodner, Kevin
item Baldwin, Elizabeth

Submitted to: Proceedings of Florida State Horticultural Society
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: December 9, 2005
Publication Date: February 28, 2006
Repository URL: http://www.ars.usda.gov/sp2UserFiles/Place/66210000/Reprint964.pdf
Citation: Mahattanatawee, K., Goodner, K.L., Baldwin, E.A. 2006. Volatile constituents and character impact compounds of selected Florida's tropical fruit. Proceedings of Florida State Horticultural Society. 118:414-418.

Interpretive Summary: The aroma volatile compounds of Florida grown tropical fruit including guava, mango and carambola were isolated with instrumentation that would identify the compounds and allow a human to smell the individual compounds. The volatile components were analyzed using two different sample preparation techniques. The combination of the two techniques resulted in 53, 48 and 46 aroma active compounds detected in carambola, guava and ripe mango, respectively. There was no single aroma character impact compound that contributed to the aroma of these fruit.

Technical Abstract: The aroma volatile compounds of Florida grown tropical fruit including guava, mango and carambola were isolated by headspace SPME and solvent extraction methods coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy (GC/MS) and GC-Olfactometry (GC-O). The volatile components were analyzed using both headspace and solvent extraction techniques in order to insure that the results of GC-O were representative of the fruit aroma. The combination of the two techniques resulted in 53, 48 and 46 aroma active compounds detected in carambola, guava and ripe mango, respectively. There was no single aroma character impact compound that contributed to the aroma of these fruit. The major classes of aroma active volatiles that contributed to the fruity aroma were the esters followed by aldehydes, alcohols, and ketones, which contribute green and sweet notes to fruit aroma. In addition, sulfur and norisoprenoid compounds contributed to the guava and carambola aromas, respectively.

Last Modified: 10/21/2014