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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: The 2005 Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee Report: Achieving Nutritional Recommendations Through Food-Based Guidance

Authors
item Weaver, Connie - PURDUE UNIVERSITY
item Nicklas, Theresa
item Britten, Patricia - HHS OFF OF DISEASE PREV

Submitted to: Nutrition Today
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: April 20, 2005
Publication Date: May 20, 2005
Citation: Weaver, C., Nicklas, T., Britten, P. 2005. The 2005 dietary guidelines advisory committee report: achieving nutritional recommendations through food-based guidance. Nutrition Today. 40(3):102-107.

Interpretive Summary: Every five years, new dietary guidelines for Americans are issued jointly by the US Department of Health and Human Services (USDHHS) and the US Department of Agriculture (USDA). These aim to give advice to the American public about diet and physical activity to promote health and minimize risk of chronic disease on the basis of the best available science. An external committee is appointed to prepare a scientific advisory report that interprets the published literature and addresses the relationship of diet and physical activity to health. Subsequent to receiving the committee's report, the USDHHS and USDA develop and release the dietary guidelines publication and messages for communicating the guidelines to the public. This article briefly describes the process the 2005 Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee followed and highlights the use of the USDA Food Intake Patterns as a tool to illustrate how nutrient adequacy and food-based recommendations could be integrated into a way of eating.

Technical Abstract: The 2005 Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee evaluated the science base for the relationships of diet and physical activity and health using an evidence-based approach. The USDA Food Intake Patterns were used as a tool to model food group recommendations that meet 100% of the current Dietary Reference Intake standards for most nutrients. Americans need to make substantial changes in food choices to meet their nutrient needs without exceeding their energy needs. The new guidelines stress the importance of making calories count by choosing nutrient-dense foods combined with adequate physical activity.

Last Modified: 10/24/2014
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