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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Tolerance in Cucumber to Cucurbit Yellow Stunting Disorder Virus

Authors
item Abou-Jawdah, S. Eid - AMERICAN UNIV OF BEIRUT
item Havey, Michael

Submitted to: Plant Disease
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: December 20, 2005
Publication Date: May 1, 2006
Citation: Abou-Jawdah, S.Y., Havey, M.J. 2006. Tolerance in cucumber to cucurbit yellow stunting disorder virus. Plant Disease. 90:645-649.

Interpretive Summary: Cucurbit yellow stunting disorder virus (CYSDV) has emerged as a serious whitefly-transmitted virus of cucumber and melon, causing between 30 and 50% yield losses. Development of resistant cultivars represents an economically and environmentally sound approach to management of this disease. A total of 124 cucumber accessions were evaluated for symptoms of CYSDV under high disease pressure over three growing seasons. Seven accessions showed delayed expression of symptoms, milder final symptoms, and lower percentages of infected plants as compared to susceptible cucumbers. Virus concentrations in the leaves of the tolerant accessions were significantly lower than susceptibles. These sources of tolerance to CYSDV will be of interest to cucumber breeders in the public and private sectors for incorporation into elite cucumbers.

Technical Abstract: Cucurbit yellow stunting disorder virus (CYSDV), genus Crinivirus and family Closteroviridae, has emerged as a serious whitefly-transmitted virus of cucurbit crops, causing between 30 and 50% yield losses. Development of resistant cultivars represents an economically and environmentally sound approach to management of this disease. A total of 124 cucumber accessions were evaluated for symptoms of CYSDV under high inoculum pressure over three growing seasons. Seven accessions showed delayed expression of symptoms, milder final symptoms, and lower percentages of infected plants as compared to susceptible cucumbers. Although none of these accessions were immune to CYSDV, virus concentrations in the middle leaves of the tolerant accessions were significantly lower than the susceptibles.

Last Modified: 4/20/2014
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