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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Field Trials of Lures to Attract Fruit Flies (Diptera: Tephriditidae) in Commercial Sapodilla, Mamey Sapote, and Carambola Orchards in Puerto Rico

Authors
item Pingel, Randall - FORMER ARS EMPLOYEE
item Epsky, Nancy
item Goenaga, Ricardo

Submitted to: Journal of Agriculture of the University of Puerto Rico
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: September 23, 2005
Publication Date: January 13, 2006
Citation: Pingel, R.L., Epsky, N.D., Goenaga, R. 2006. Field trials to attract fruit flies (Diptera: Tephritidae) in commercial sapodilla, mamey sapote, and carambola orchards in Puerto Rico. Journal of Agriculture of the University of Puerto Rico. 90:109-113.

Interpretive Summary: Traditional protein lures used to attract fruit flies must be changed weekly and attract numerous quantities of unwanted fly species, both contributing to loss of valuable time while monitoring fruit flies to make pest management decisions. Food-based synthetic lures have shown some promise as an effective alternative attractant; however, they have not been fully tested with different species and populations of fruit flies in a variety of fruit hosts at different locations. Field trials in Puerto Rico were conducted to compare the attractiveness of the standard bait of pelletized torula yeast with a two component (ammonium acetate and putrescine) synthetic lure within sapodilla, mamey sapote, and carambola orchards. In addition, the trapping was conducted to provide information on the fruit fly pressure and species composition within the three fruit crops. Many more female and male flies were collected over the entire collection periods in traps containing torula yeast when compared with the two component synthetic lure in sapodilla and mamey sapote. Fruit fly numbers, mainly the Caribbean fruit fly, within sapodilla was extremely high; in contrast, an insignificant number of fruit flies were captured in mamey sapote. Within carambola, more flies were captured with the two component synthetic lure compared with torula yeast, and the predominant species was the West Indian fruit fly. For both lure types, there were more females than males captured within all fruit plots. The results of this study indicate that fruit fly pressure is extremely low in mamey sapote potentially making this fruit suitable for export. Experimental procedures according to APHIS protocols must now be conducted to determine final host status of this fruit to A. suspensa and other fruit flies.

Technical Abstract: Field trials in Puerto Rico were conducted to compare the attractiveness of the standard bait of pelletized torula yeast/borax with a two component (ammonium acetate and putrescine) synthetic lure for Anastrepha spp. within orchards of sapodilla, mamey sapote, and carambola. In addition, the trapping was conducted to provide information on the fruit fly pressure and species composition within the 3 fruit crops. Significantly more female and male flies were collected over the entire collection periods in traps containing torula yeast when compared with the two component synthetic lure in sapodilla and mamey sapote. Fruit fly pressure from predominantly A. suspensa within sapodilla was extremely high; in contrast, very few of either species was found in mamey sapote. Within carambola, significantly more flies were captured with the two component synthetic lure, and the predominant species was A. obliqua. For both lure types, there was a distinct female bias for the sex ratio of flies captured within all fruit plots.

Last Modified: 9/10/2014
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