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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Berry Genetic Resources: Management, Distribution and Evaluation

Author
item Hummer, Kim

Submitted to: Meeting Proceedings
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: July 20, 2005
Publication Date: July 20, 2005
Citation: Hummer, K.E. 2005. Berry genetic resources: management, distribution and evaluation. [abstract]. Meeting Proceedings. p.29.

Interpretive Summary: he United States Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, National Clonal Germplasm Repository at Corvallis, Oregon, is assigned to preserve global genetic diversity of assorted berry crops for the National Plant Germplasm System. The primary U. S. national genetic resource collections of strawberries, currants and gooseberries, blackberries and raspberries, and blueberries and cranberries are preserved as growing plants under insect-proof, screen-covered buildings. Seeds, representing wild species, are prepared and stored at in freezers in plastic bags. About 10 % of the clonal accessions are backed up as tissue culture plantlets and are preserved in plastic bags of hormone-free media under refrigerated conditions for medium-term (up to 5 years) storage. Tiny growing tips cut from tissue cultured plantlets, pollen and some seed representatives are preserved in liquid nitrogen at -196 oC for long-term (10 years or more) storage. Representative samples of seeds, tissue cultures and cryopreserved meristems are sent to a remote location, in Fort Collins, Colorado, and serve as a long-term, back-up, base collection. The Repository annually distributes more than 3,000 accessions of seeds, cuttings, tissue cultures, and DNA, to more than 400 requestors. International requests are shipped in compliance with quarantine regulations and inspection by agricultural officials in the shipping and receiving countries. The primary collections of berry crops are tested for pathogens of importance to the United States. DNA Fingerprints for clonal and taxonomic identification are being established using molecular markers, such as simple sequence repeats (SSR). Details of the tissue culture, pathogen testing, and fingerprinting protocols will be presented.

Technical Abstract: The United States Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, National Clonal Germplasm Repository at Corvallis, Oregon, is assigned to preserve global genetic diversity of assorted berry crops for the National Plant Germplasm System. The primary U. S. national genetic resource collections of strawberries (Fragaria L.), currants and gooseberries (Ribes L.), blackberries and raspberries (Rubus L.), and blueberries and cranberries (Vaccinium L.) are preserved as growing plants under insect-proof, screen-covered buildings. Seeds, representing wild species, are prepared and stored at -20 oC in aluminum-coated plastic bags. About 10 % of the clonal accessions are backed up as tissue culture plantlets and are preserved in plastic bags of hormone-free media under refrigerated conditions for medium-term (up to 5 years) storage. Meristems excised from tissue cultured clonal plantlets, pollen and some seed representatives are preserved in liquid nitrogen at -196 oC for long-term (10 years or more) storage. Representative samples of seeds, tissue cultures and cryopreserved meristems are sent to a remote location, in Fort Collins, Colorado, as a long-term, back-up, base collection. The Repository annually distributes more than 3,000 accessions of seeds, cuttings, tissue cultures, and DNA, to more than 400 requestors. International requests are shipped in compliance with quarantine regulations and inspection by agricultural officials in the shipping and receiving countries. The primary collections of berry crops are tested for pathogens of importance to the United States. DNA Fingerprints for clonal and taxonomic identification are being established using molecular markers, such as simple sequence repeats (SSR). Details of the tissue culture, pathogen testing, and fingerprinting protocols will be presented.

Last Modified: 4/19/2014
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