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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Fruit Quality of 'd'anjou' Pears after Bin Storage and Late Season Packing

Authors
item Drake, Stephen
item Elfving, D - WSU, WENATCHEE, WA
item Pusey, Paul
item Kupferman, E - WSU, WENATCHEE, WA

Submitted to: Journal of Food Processing and Preservation
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: June 1, 2005
Publication Date: August 1, 2006
Citation: Drake, S.R., Elfving, D.C., Pusey, P.L., Kupferman, E.M. 2006. Fruit quality of 'd'anjou' pears after bin storage and late season packing. Journal of Food Processing.and Preservation v.30:420-432

Interpretive Summary: Scald and decay control are the major problems associated with the long-term storage of 'd'Anjou' pears. Control of decay is a constant problem as older fungicides lose effectiveness and fruit tolerance to new fungicides must be determined. In this 3-year study, 'd'Anjou' pears were drenched with various combinations of decay (Scholar, Penbotec and Thiabendazole) and scald (ethoxyquin and diphenylamine) control compounds alone or in combination and quality evaluated after long term controlled atmosphere storage. Decay problems were limited with or without the use of fungicides, but scald control was a major problem after long-term bin storage. Ethoxyquin reduced scald incidence to acceptable levels but stimulated the severity of hytotoxicity. However, when fruit were evaluated by quality control personnel, phytotoxicity did not represent a major issue and the amount of scald present was within reason. In some instances, ethoxyquin treatment enhanced sensory scores for finish and pedicel condition, improving fruit grade. In this study, scald control was better for ethoxyquin compared to diphenylamine. Diphenylamine is not registered for use on pears at the present time. However, diphenylamine did produce acceptable scald control even though it aggravated phytotoxicity; diphenylamine might be considered for future use as a scald control for pears. 'd'Anjou' pears packed in boxes with ethoxyquin and Cu-paper wraps developed less decay and scald than pears in poly bags. If pears are to be packed in poly bags after bin storage, additional means of decay and scald prevention need to be employed.

Technical Abstract: Scald and decay control are the major problems associated with the long-term storage of 'd'Anjou' pears. In this 3-year study, 'd'Anjou' pears were drenched with various combinations of fungicides [Scholar (fludioxinil), Penbotec (pyrimethanil)and Mertect (thiabendazole) and anti-scald agents(ethoxyquin and diphenylamine) control compounds alone or in combination and fruit quality was evaluated after long-term controlled atmosphere storage. Little decay was evident with or without the use of fungicides, but scald control was a major problem after long term bin storage. Ethoxyquin reduced scald incidence to acceptable levels but stimulated the severity of hytotoxicity. However, when fruit were evaluated by quality control personnel, phytotoxicity did not represent a major issue and the amount of scald present was within reason. In some instances, ethoxyquin treatment enhanced sensory scores for finish and pedicel condition, improving fruit grade. In this study, scald control was better for ethoxyquin compared to diphenylamine. Diphenylamine is not registered for use on pears at the present time. However, diphenylamine did produce acceptable scald control even though it aggravated phytotoxicity; diphenylamine might be considered for future use as a scald control for pears. 'd'Anjou' pears packed in boxes with ethoxyquin and Cu-paper wraps developed less decay and scald than pears in poly bags. If pears are to be packed in poly bags after bin storage, additional means of decay and scald prevention need to be employed.

Last Modified: 8/1/2014
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