Page Banner

United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: An Adme Study with 2,2',4,4',5,6'-Hexabromodiphenyl Ether (Bde-154) in Male Spragye-Dawley Rats.

Authors
item Hakk, Heldur
item Huwe, Janice
item Larsen, Gerald

Submitted to: Organohalogen Compounds
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: May 27, 2005
Publication Date: August 1, 2005
Citation: Hakk, H., Huwe, J.K., Larsen, G.L. 2005. An ADME study with 2,2',4,4',5,6'-hexabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-154) in male Sprague-Dawley rats. Organohalogen Compounds 67:2339-2342.

Interpretive Summary: The polybrominated diphenyl ethers(PBDEs)are among the most abundant brominated flame retardants in use. Furthermore, a particular subset of five PBDEs are known to be environmentally persistent, among which is 2,2',4,4',5,6'-hexabromodiphenyl ether, i.e. BDE-154. The purpose of this study was to measure the metabolic behavior of radiolabeled [14C]BDE-154 in male rats for 3 days. A minimum of 56% of a single oral dose of BDE-154 was absorbed from the gut. Of this value, 31% was found in tissues of the carcass at 72h and 24% was extractable or non-extractable metabolites in the feces, and about 1% was excreted in the urine. BDE-154 was not readily excreted in the bile (1.3%). The largest portion of the BDE-154 dose was detected in the carcass, GI tract, adipose tissue and liver. Further fractionation of the carcass revealed approximately half of the radioactivity deposited in the skin. When the tissue data is expressed on a concentration basis, the lipophilic tissues had the highest concentration of BDE-154, i.e. adipose tissue, GI tract, adrenal gland, skin, and liver, although it could be found in every tissue sampled. Extractable fecal metabolites were identified by mass spectrometry and indicated hydroxylation and debromination were the only characteristic pathways of rat metabolism of BDE-154. Non-extractable fecal metabolites were hypothesized to be the result of metabolism and binding to protein and/or lipid in the feces, therefore, a considerably higher overall metabolism of BDE-154 was suggested when also considering the non-extractable fecal data than from the urine, bile and extractable fecal metabolite data alone.

Technical Abstract: The polybrominated diphenyl ethers(PBDEs)are among the most abundant brominated flame retardants in use in many consumer products. A particular subset of five PBDEs are known to be environmentally persistent, i.e. BDE-47, -99, -100, 153, and -154. Mammalian ADME studies have already been performed for BDE-47, -99, and -100. The purpose of this study was to measure the metabolic behavior of radiolabeled [14C]BDE-154 in conventional and bile-duct cannulated male rats for 3 days. BDE-154 was absorbed reasonably well after a single oral dose, and preferentially deposited in lipophilic tissues, i.e. epididymal fat (1.8%), carcass (12%), GI tract (3.7%), adrenals (0.1%), and skin (12%), although it was detected in every tissue sampled. When the tissue data was expressed on a concentration basis, the lipophilic tissues had the highest concentration of BDE-154, i.e. adipose tissue (30 nmol/g fresh weight), adrenal gland (22), GI tract (18), skin (8), and liver (6). Low excretion to water-soluble metabolites was observed, i.e. 1% of the dose was excreted via the urine, and approximately 1.3% was excreted in the bile after 3 days. Fecal excretion was the major route of elimination (62% at 3 days), and it contained a high level of non-extractable BDE-154 residues (26-42%). Metabolites identified in the extractable portion of the feces were monohydroxylated, monohydroxylated with an accompanying loss of a bromine, dihydroxylated with an accompanying loss of two bromines. The non-extractable fecal radioactivity was hypothesized to form via metabolic activation followed by covalent binding to proteins and/or lipids. Therefore, the actual level of overall metabolism of BDE-154 is considerably higher than indicated by urine, bile and extractable fecal excretion data alone.

Last Modified: 12/26/2014
Footer Content Back to Top of Page