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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Calcium Intake and Dairy Product Consumption by Children and Young Adults

Authors
item Ponnusamy, Chitra - BAYLOR COLLEGE OF MED
item Yang, Su-Jau - BAYLOR COLLEGE OF MED
item Nicklas, Theresa

Submitted to: Journal of Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: March 1, 2003
Publication Date: April 1, 2003
Citation: Ponnusamy, C., Yang, S., Nicklas, T. 2003. Calcium intake and dairy product consumption by children and young adults. Journal of Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology. 17:A294.

Interpretive Summary: AN INTERPRETIVE SUMMARY IS NOT REQUIRED.

Technical Abstract: Osteoporosis, which is associated with low calcium intake, is a public health threat to older adults and begins developing early in life. The purpose of this study was to examine trends in calcium intake and dairy product consumption from 1973 to 1994 in 1584 10-year-olds (65% whites; 35% blacks; 49% males) and 1336 young adults (ages 19-38 years; 73% whites; 27%blacks; 38% males). From 1973 to 1994, the percent of children consuming milk decreased while the percent consuming cheese increased (p < .0001). The mean gram consumption of milk decreased (p < 0.01) and cheese increased (p < 0.0001) during the same period. However, total calcium intakes significantly increased (p < .0001). The major food sources of calcium in children did not change over time; being highest for milk (45%), cheese (10%) breads/grains (8%), and sweetened beverages (4%). The major food sources of calcium in young adults were milk (21%) breads/grains (18%), cheese (14%), and sweetened beverages (8%). Sixty-nine percent of 10-year-olds, did not meet the AI for calcium, being highest among females (75%). Eight out of 10 girls and 6 out of 10 boys did not meet the AI for calcium. In young adults, 77% did not meet AI for calcium being highest among whites (79%) and females (80%). Eight out of 10 young adult females and 7 out of 10 males did not meet the AI for calcium. A large percentage of children do not meet current AI calcium recommendations, even with increasing calcium intakes.

Last Modified: 8/21/2014
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