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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Is Diet Related to the Clustering of Risk Factors for Metabolic Syndrome? the Bogalusa Heart Study

Authors
item Yoo, Sunmi - UNIV. COLLEGE OF MED
item Nicklas, Theresa
item Baranowski, Thomas
item Zakeri, Issa
item Yang, Su-Jau - BAYLOR COLLEGE OF MED
item Srinivasan, Sathanur - TULANE UNIV MED CENTER
item Berenson, Gerald - TULANE UNIV MED CENTER

Submitted to: American Journal of Epidemiology
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: May 1, 2003
Publication Date: June 1, 2003
Citation: Yoo, S., Nicklas, T., Baranowski, T., Zakeri, I., Yang, S., Srinivasan, S.R., Berenson, G.S. Is diet related to the clustering of risk factors for metabolic syndrome? The Bogalusa Heart Study. American Journal of Epidemiology. 2003;157:S78.

Interpretive Summary: AN INTERPRETIVE SUMMARY IS NOT REQUIRED.

Technical Abstract: The association between dietary intakes and metabolic syndrome risk variables was examined in 1,181 young adults (ages 19-38 years; 25 percent African Americans and 62 percent females) in Bogalusa, Louisiana. Dietary intakes were assessed using a semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire. A composite score for risk variables was generated using principal component analysis which included body mass index, waist circumference, systolic and diastolic blood pressures, fasting glucose, fasting insulin, HDL-cholesterol and triglycerides. All risk variables loaded on a single factor, which explained 46.7 percent of the total variance. Using this composite score as the outcome variable, we performed linear regression analysis. Meat and sweetened beverages showed significant positive association with the outcome variable, but these associations disappeared after controlling for age, gender, ethnicity, smoking status, physical activity out of work and family histories of diabetes and heart attacks. Intakes of alcohol, fruit, juice, and vegetables were negatively associated with the outcome variable, even after controlling for covariates (p<0.05). Longitudinal research is necessary to provide stronger etiological evidence for these relationships.

Last Modified: 12/22/2014
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