Page Banner

United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Establishment Response of Forage Chicory to Available Soil Phosphorus in Appalachia

Authors
item Cassida, Kimberly
item Foster, Joyce
item Gonzalez, Javier
item Sanderson, Matt
item Ritchey, Kenneth

Submitted to: American Forage and Grassland Council Conference Proceedings
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: May 11, 2005
Publication Date: June 12, 2005
Citation: Cassida, K.A., Foster, J.G., Gonzalez, J.M., Sanderson, M.A., Ritchey, K.D. 2005. Establishment response of forage chicory to available soil phosphorus in Appalachia. p. 52, 232-236. In K. Cassida (ed.) Proc. Amer. Forage Grassl. Counc., Vol. 14, Bloomington, IL. 11-15 June 2005. AFGC, Georgetown, TX.

Interpretive Summary: Chicory is a nutritious, productive, drought-tolerant plant that is productive in many regions, but some cultivars have shown poor performance when grown in West Virginia. In 2004, we established chicory cultivars in West Virginia and Pennsylvania with the ultimate purpose of evaluating effects of location and available soil phosphorus on growth, persistence, nutritive value, and palatability of five chicory cultivars. In the establishment year, phosphorus fertility improved growth of some cultivars but not others, and cultivar responses to phosphorus differed across sites. This work is useful because it begins to explain the disappointing performance of forage chicory in parts of Appalachia. The work will benefit livestock producers because appropriate cultivar selection and phosphorus fertilization for the location can improve reliability of chicory establishment.

Technical Abstract: Chicory is a nutritious, productive, drought-tolerant plant that is productive in many regions, but some cultivars have shown poor palatability to animals when grown in West Virginia. We established chicory cultivars in West Virginia and Pennsylvania to evaluate the effect of location and available soil P (ASP) on plant growth, nutritive value, and palatability. In PA, the trial included three cultivars (‘Grasslands Puna’, ‘Forage Feast’, ‘Lacerta’) and two ASP rates (47 and 70 lb/acre), while in WV two additional cultivars (‘La Nina’, ‘Six Point’) and one additional ASP rate (25 lb/acre) were used. Stand density, leaf length, and number of leaves per seedling were greater in WV than in PA through 55 days after planting (DAP). Across sites, Puna had more and longer leaves per plant than Lacerta or Forage Feast in the first 55 DAP, and Forage Feast had lower stand density than Puna or Lacerta. In PA, herbage yield tended to increase from medium to high ASP in the first harvest, but not in regrowth. In WV, Lacerta and La Nina regrowth yields increased and Forage Feast yields decreased with increasing ASP, but Puna and Six Point yields were unaffected by ASP. Location affected growth response of chicory cultivars to ASP during establishment.

Last Modified: 10/1/2014