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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Biologically Based Technologies for the Suppression of Soilborne Pathogens of Vegetables

Authors
item Roberts, Daniel
item Abdul Baki, Aref
item Zasada, Inga
item Meyer, Susan
item Waldy, Klassen - U OF FL TROP RES EDU CTR

Submitted to: Review Article
Publication Type: Review Article
Publication Acceptance Date: May 20, 2005
Publication Date: August 10, 2005
Citation: Roberts, D.P., Abdul Baki, A.A., Zasada, I.A., Meyer, S.L., Waldy, K. 2005. Biologically based technologies for the suppression of soilborne pathogens of vegetables. Review Article. Recent Res. Develop. Applied Microbiol. Biotechnol. 2:51-67.

Interpretive Summary: There is renewed interest in developing biologically based technologies for the control of soilborne plant-pathogenic fungi and nematodes in vegetable production systems. This interest is driven in part by the need to develop strategies that are less harmful to man and the environment than conventional chemically based methods. In addition, a number of chemical pesticides have been deregistered for agricultural use leaving growers inadequate measures for disease control. We present a brief overview of our research with microbiologically based biological control and cover crops for the suppression of soilborne plant-pathogenic fungi and nematodes. Emphasis is placed on our development of these technologies as replacements for methyl bromide in vegetable production systems. We also discuss approaches for enhancing the performance of these biologically based technologies through their use in combination. This information will be useful to scientists devising strategies for biologically based control of soilborne diseases on vegetable crops.

Technical Abstract: There is renewed interest in developing biologically based technologies for the control of soilborne plant-pathogenic fungi and nematodes. Biologically based technologies are thought to be more environmentally friendly than chemical pesticides used in conventional agricultural production systems. Unfortunately, biologically based technologies can be less effective than chemically based methods. Here we present a brief overview of our research with microbiologically based biological control and cover crops for the suppression of soilborne plant-pathogenic fungi and nematodes. Emphasis is placed on our development of these technologies as replacements for methyl bromide in vegetable production systems. We also discuss approaches for enhancing the performance of these biologically based technologies through their use in combination.

Last Modified: 11/26/2014
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