Page Banner

United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Detection of Tyrosine Crosslink in Wheat Kernels at Various Stages of Development

Authors
item Benjamin, R - KANSAS STATE UNIV.
item Tilley, Michael
item Reamer, E - KANSAS STATE UNIV.
item Srivarin, P - KANSAS STATE UNIV.
item Tilley, K - KANSAS STATE UNIV.

Submitted to: Meeting Abstract
Publication Type: Other
Publication Acceptance Date: April 22, 2005
Publication Date: May 22, 2005
Citation: Benjamin, R.E., Tilley, M., Reamer, E.M., Srivarin, P., Tilley, K.A. 2005. Detection of tyrosine crosslink in wheat kernels at various stages of development. Program Book of the 3rd International Wheat Quality Conference. 2005. Abstract p. 393. Meeting Abstract.

Technical Abstract: The ability of a given wheat, or flour derived from that wheat, to form gluten determines its utilization quality. The storage material found in the wheat kernel (endosperm) is processed into flour, and flour is used to develop a viscoelastic dough. Recently, evidence indicates that tyrosine bonds form during dough mixing and breadmaking processes. Tyrosine crosslinks can also form during wheat kernel development, resulting in reduced breadmaking quality. To determine whether tyrosine crosslinks could be detected in developing wheat kernels at various stages, a wheat variety demonstrating poor breadmaking quality was studied. Wheat varieties possessing good baking quality have little, if any, tyrosine crosslink present in the endosperm of the mature kernels. Very little tyrosine crosslink was present at 5 dpa. At 10 and 15 dpa, an increased amount of tyrosine crosslink was detected. At 25 dpa, a notable increase in tyrosine crosslink was detected. This is the point during kernel development that coincides with a rapid increase in glutenin proteins. At full maturity, the kernels had an even greater amount of tyrosine crosslink present. This data shows that tyrosine bond formation can be monitored during wheat kernel development in order to predict the breadmaking quality of a given allotment of wheat.

Last Modified: 10/21/2014
Footer Content Back to Top of Page