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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Effect of Diet on the Disruption of Operant Responding at Different Ages Following Exposure to Fe56 Particles

Authors
item Rabin, Bernard - UMBC
item Carrihill-Knoll, Kirsty - UMBC
item Carey, Amanda
item Shukitt-Hale, Barbara
item Joseph, James

Submitted to: American Aging Association
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: February 22, 2005
Publication Date: May 2, 2005
Citation: Rabin, B.M., Carrihill-Knoll, K.L., Carey, A.N., Shukitt Hale, B., Joseph, J.A. 2005. Effect of diet on the disruption of operant responding at different ages following exposure to fe56 particles. Age. 205, 27, 69-73.

Interpretive Summary: Previous studies have indicated that significant adverse alterations in brain cell communication and behavior similar to that seen in aged animals can also be seen in animals irradiated with particles of high energy and charges, such as iron. This research also has shown that, as has been seen in aged animals, dietary supplementation with high antioxidant-strawberry or blueberry extracts reversed many of the age-related changes. Therefore, in this study, rats were exposed to high energy iron particles to study the relationship between age and diet in the heavy particle-induced disruption of performance on an ascending fixed-ratio task (required to press a bar more and more times to obtain food reward). Irradiation produced a disruption of operant responding in rats tested 5 and 8 months after exposure, which was prevented by maintaining the rats on a diet containing strawberry, but not blueberry, extract. When tested at 13 and 18 months there were no differences in performance between the radiated rats maintained on control, strawberry or blueberry diets. These observations suggest that the beneficial effects of antioxidant diets may be dependent upon the age of testing.

Technical Abstract: Previous studies have indicated that significant adverse alterations in brain cell communication and behavior similar to that seen in aged animals, can also be seen in animals irradiated with particles of high energy and charges, such as iron. This research also has shown that, as has been seen in aged animals, dietary supplementation with high antioxidant-strawberry or blueberry extracts reversed many of the age-related changes. To further evaluate the relationship between age and diet in the heavy particle-induce disruption of performance on an ascending fixed-ratio task, rats were exposed to 2.0Gy of 56Fe particles. Irradiation produced a disruption of operant responding in rats tested 5 and 8 months after exposure, which was prevented by maintaining the rats on a diet containing strawberry, but not blueberry, extract. When tested 13 and 18 months there were no differences in performance between the radiated rats maintained on control, strawberry or blueberry diets. These observations suggest that the beneficial effects of antioxidant diets may be dependant upon the age of testing.

Last Modified: 4/20/2014