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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Implications of Biological, Behavioral, Modeling and Host Selection Studies on Development of Asian Longhorn Beetle Management Strategies in North American Forests

Author
item Smith, Michael

Submitted to: Yale Forest Forum Publication Series
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: August 20, 2003
Publication Date: December 20, 2003
Repository URL: http://www.ars.usda.gov/sp2UserFiles/Place/19260000/MTSmith/211_Implications.pdf
Citation: Smith, M.T., 2003. Implications of Biological, Behavioral, Modeling and Host Selection Studies on Development of Asian Longhorn Beetle Management strategies in North American Forests. Yale Forest Forum Publication Series, 'New Threats to North American Forest', 6(1): 20-23.

Technical Abstract: The Beneficial Insects Introduction Research Unit has conducted extensive research in Northern China on the life history and behavioral aspects of Asian Longhorned Beetle (ALB). One goal of this research is to identify the main factors that influence ALB populations and to develop models for predicting their spread, which in turn can help forest managers formulate strategies for dealing with the beetle in ecosystems like the North American hardwood forests. The successful development of predictive models requires an understanding of the influence biotic and abiotic factors have on behavioral and population parameter characteristics. Adult beetle behavior has been studied and as such broken down into at least six different categories. The nutritional differences between various host tree species may affect some of these behaviors. Complementary field experiments were used to assess the dispersal potential of ALB, including measures of both flight propensity (the tendency to take flight) and flight capacity (flight distance). These studies, together with geospatial analysis of landscape features, provided a comprehensive analysis of the characteristics of ALB movement. Furthermore, in-flight orientation studies provided a more detailed assessment of ALB flight behavior, including the role of vision and olfaction. Collectively, studies of ALB movement within different landscapes have resulted in models that are used to formulate landscape-specific protocols for early detection and control. Ultimately, an understanding of species richness, diversity, host quality and health will be the basis for predicting how Asian Longhorned Beetle might spread in North America.

Last Modified: 4/17/2014
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