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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Effects of Soils from Six Management Systems on Root-Knot Nematode and Plant Growth in Greenhouse Assays

Authors
item Burelle, Nancy
item Chellemi, Daniel
item Peries, X. - STUDENT, ISACA

Submitted to: Journal of Nematology
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: April 1, 2005
Publication Date: December 1, 2005
Citation: Burelle, N.K., Chellemi, D.O., Peries, X. 2005. EFFECTS OF SOILS FROM SIX MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS ON ROOT-KNOT NEMATODE AND PLANT GROWTH IN GREENHOUSE ASSAYS. Journal of Nematology. 37(4):467-472.

Interpretive Summary: Growers currently rely primarily on fumigation with methyl bromide to control soilborne pests. However, methyl bromide has been implicated as a major ozone depleting substance and its use in the USA is being phased out. Currently, there is no single alternative fumigant or chemical pesticide that is as effective, convenient to use and inexpensive as methyl bromide. Therefore, effective management of soilborne pests in the post methyl bromide era will need to be achieved by the use of multiple tactics. The effects of soil management strategies used in vegetable production systems on the viability and fungal parasitism of root-knot nematode (Meloidogyne incognita) eggs were evaluated in these studies. Soil was collected from a large, replicated field experiment consisting of six management strategies for use in greenhouse experiments. Identification of egg parasitic fungi and the incidence of root-knot nematode galling were assessed in both tomato and double-cropped cucumber. Management strategy did not affect fungal parasites of root-knot nematode eggs. However, soil management systems differed in their effects on egg viability and on the types of fungi isolated from parasitized eggs. Although no treatment emerged as consistently conducive to the development of egg parasitic fungi, several treatments including organic, disk fallow, and conventional production, had lower levels of galling on both tomato, and on cucumber following tomato. A greater understanding of the interactions among soil microorganisms and nematodes will facilitate the implementation of more effective strategies for nematode control utilizing whatever tools are available.

Technical Abstract: The effects of soil management strategies used in vegetable production systems on the viability and fungal parasitism of root-knot nematode (Meloidogyne incognita) eggs were evaluated. Soil was collected from a large, replicated field experiment consisting of six management strategies (conventional, organic, bahiagrass (Paspalum notatum) pasture, bahiagrass:Stylosanthes (Stylosanthes guianensis) pasture, bare ground fallow, and weed fallow) for use in greenhouse experiments. Identification of egg parasitic fungi and the incidence of root-knot nematode galling were assessed in both tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) and double-cropped cucumber (Cucumis sativus). Management strategy did not affect fungal parasites of eggs. However, systems did differ in their effects on egg viability and on the types of fungi isolated from parasitized eggs. Although no treatment emerged as consistently conducive to the development of egg parasitic fungi, several treatments including organic, disk fallow, and conventional production, had lower levels of galling on both tomato, and on cucumber following tomato.

Last Modified: 10/20/2014
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