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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Genetic and Environmental Factors Influencing Fasting Serum Adiponectin in Hispanic Children

Authors
item Butte, Nancy
item Comuzzie, Anthony - SFBR, SAN ANTONIO
item Cai, Gouwen - SFBR, SAN ANTONIO
item Cole, Shelley - SFBR, SAN ANTONIO
item Mehta, Nitesh - BAYLOR COLLEGE MED
item Bacino, Carlos - BAYLOR COLLEGE MED

Submitted to: Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: April 1, 2005
Publication Date: April 12, 2005
Citation: Butte, N.F., Comuzzie, A.G., Cai, G., Cole, S.A., Mehta, N., Bacino, C.A. 2005. Genetic and environmental factors influencing fasting serum adiponectin in Hispanic children. Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism. doi:10.1210/jc.2004-2328

Interpretive Summary: Adiponectin is a protein only secreted from adipose tissue. Because of its anti-inflammatory and insulin-sensitizing properties, adiponectin may play a role in the development of cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes. We investigated genetic and environmental factors influencing fasting serum adiponectin in 805 Hispanic non-overweight and overweight children, ages 4-19 y, participating in the VIVA LA FAMILIA Study. We measured body composition by DXA, and fasting serum biochemistries by RIA, ELISA or colorimetric-enzymatic methods. We found that adiponectin was highly heritable in this population. Serum adiponectin was higher in younger children, and higher in boys than girls. As shown by others, serum adiponectin was significantly lower in overweight children. Adiponectin levels declined with age, in part due to changes in sex hormones and growth factors. Adiponectin was negatively correlated with insulin resistance, serum lipid levels and systolic blood pressure. The high heritability of adiponectin in these Hispanic children may contribute to their genetic predisposition to cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes.

Technical Abstract: Because of its anti-inflammatory and insulin-sensitizing properties, adiponectin may play a role in the development of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and type 2 diabetes (T2D). Genetic and environmental factors influencing fasting serum adiponectin were investigated in 805 Hispanic non-overweight and overweight children, ages 4-19 y, participating in the VIVA LA FAMILIA Study. Body composition was measured by DXA, and serum biochemistries by standard methods. Heritability (h2) of serum adiponectin was 0.93 +/- 0.10 (P=2.4x10-40). Adiponectin differed by age (P=0.001), sex (P=0.04) and weight status (P=0.001). Adiponectin levels declined with age, in association with changes in sex hormones and growth factors. Adiponectin was not associated with macronutrient intake, fitness, 24-h energy expenditure, or fat oxidation. Controlling for age, sex and %FM, adiponectin was inversely associated with HOMA-IR, TG/HDL-C, and systolic blood pressure (P=0.001). Significant positive genetic correlations were detected between adiponectin and TC (rhoG =0.19), HDL-C (rhoG =0.32), LDL-C (rhoG =0.24), and IGFBP-1 (rhoG =0.39), and negative genetic correlations between adiponectin and leptin (rhoG =-0.30), TG (rhoG =-0.21), TG/HDL-C (rhoG =-0.33), and IGFBP-3 (rhoG =-0.32), indicating shared genetic components in their expression. The high heritability of adiponectin in these Hispanic children may contribute to their genetic predisposition to CVD and T2D.

Last Modified: 10/1/2014