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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: The Window of Risk for Emigration of Wheat Streak Mosaic Virus Varies with Host Eradication Method

Authors
item Jiang, Wenbo - KSU - PLANT PATHOLOGY
item Garrett, Karen - KSU - PLANT PATHOLOGY
item Peterson, D - KSU - AGRONOMY
item Harvey, T - KSU - ENTOMOLOGY
item Bowden, Robert
item Fang, L - KSU - PLANT PATHOLOGY

Submitted to: Plant Disease
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: March 21, 2005
Publication Date: August 1, 2005
Citation: Jiang, W., Garrett, K.A., Peterson, D.E., Harvey, T.L., Bowden, R.L., Fang, L. 2005. The window of risk for emigration of wheat streak mosaic virus varies with host eradication method. Plant Disease. Vol. 89 No. 8 pp.853-858.

Interpretive Summary: The wheat curl mite (WCM), the vector of Wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV), often survives the summer on volunteer wheat and may disperse from this 'green bridge' in fall to newly-planted winter wheat. Because some methods for managing volunteer wheat do not immediately kill WCM, there is a window of risk for WCM and WSMV emigration after management has been applied. WCM survival in response to treatment of wheat by glyphosate, paraquat, stem cutting, and withholding water was measured in greenhouse experiments to determine how this window of risk for emigration varies with management. WCM populations on plants treated with paraquat or stem cutting decreased from the beginning of the sampling period. WCM populations on plants treated with glyphosate or which received no water increased up to three days after application and then decreased by ten days after application. If glyphosate is used to manage volunteer wheat infested with WCM, it should be applied well before wheat is planted in fall. The total green leaf area was strongly correlated with the number of WCM for treated plants and could be used in the field to predict the post-treatment survival of mites that pose a risk of emigration.

Technical Abstract: The wheat curl mite (WCM), Aceria tosichella, the vector of Wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV), often survives the summer on volunteer wheat (Triticum aestivum) and may disperse from this 'green bridge' in fall to newly-planted winter wheat. Because some methods for managing volunteer wheat do not directly kill WCM, there is a window of risk for WCM and WSMV emigration after management has been applied. WCM survival in response to treatment of wheat by glyphosate, paraquat, stem cutting, and withholding water was measured in greenhouse experiments to determine how this window of risk for emigration varies with management. WCM populations on plants treated with paraquat or stem cutting decreased from the beginning of the sampling period. WCM populations on plants treated with glyphosate or which received no water increased up to three days after application and then decreased by ten days after application. If glyphosate is used to manage volunteer wheat infested with WCM, it should be applied well before wheat is planted in fall. There was some tendency for WCM in declining populations to be in an upright posture that could facilitate emigration via wind. The total green leaf area was strongly correlated with the number of WCM for treated plants and could be used in the field to predict the post-treatment survival of mites that pose a risk of emigration.

Last Modified: 11/27/2014
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