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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Propagation Methods for Producing Strawberry Plants for Fall Cropping in the Mid-Atlantic Coast Region

Author
item Takeda, Fumiomi

Submitted to: Annual Cumberland Shenandoah Fruit Workers Conference
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: January 10, 2005
Publication Date: March 15, 2005
Citation: Takeda, F. 2005. Propagation methods for producing strawberry plants for fall cropping in the mid-atlantic coast region. Annual Cumberland Shenandoah Fruit Workers Conference. pp 133-135.

Interpretive Summary: Alternative strawberry plant material is needed for producing high quality fruit to meet the market demand for locally produced fresh strawberries from September to December in the mid-Atlantic coast region. Dormant or cold-stored plants and fresh dug Canadian transplants have presented problems for the mid-Atlantic coast growers. Studies were conducted over three years (2002-2004) to determine the potential of plug transplants to produce strawberry fruit in the fall in the mid-Atlantic coast region. Greenhouse hydroponic production system was used to generate propagation material in July and August. Flowers and fruit were present on 80% or more of transplants that were propagated in July. Each of the July-plugged plants possessed between 9 and 11 flowers and fruit in November. Some of the ripe fruit weighed 1-1/4 oz. The results suggested that the potential to produce a significant crop from October to December in the mid-Atlantic can be enhanced by using transplants that are propagated in July protective high tunnel production system in the field. Income from fall and spring strawberry production (double cropping) can help to raise farm profitability.

Technical Abstract: Studies were conducted over three years (2002-2004) to determine the potential of plug transplants to produce strawberries in the fall in the mid-Atlantic coast region. Greenhouse hydroponic production system was used to generate propagation material in July and August. Mature runner tips were harvested and stuck in cell packs for rooting. Containerized transplants were held on greenhouse bench until field establishment in early September. Vegetative and reproductive parameters were recorded in October and November. Runnering in the field was negligible in all plants. July-plugged plants increased branch crown number to three while August-plugged plants averaged only two branch crowns. Fall reproductive development was influenced by runner-tip harvest date. Among August-plugged plants, flower buds had emerged in only a third of plants. In contrast, flowers and fruit were present on 80% or more of transplants that were propagated in July. Each of the July-plugged plants possessed between 9 and 11 flowers and fruit in November. Some of the ripe fruit weighed 34 g. The results suggested that July-plugged plants had the potential to produce a significant crop from October to December in the mid-Atlantic coast region by using protective high tunnel production system.

Last Modified: 4/18/2014