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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Conserved Amino Acid Sequences Confer Nuclear Localization Upon the Prophet of Pit-1 Pituitary Transcription Factor Protein

Authors
item Guy, J - PURDUE UNIV., IN
item Hunter, C - PURDUE UNIV., IN
item Showalter, A - ELI LILLY, IN
item Smith, Timothy
item Charoonpatrapong, K - INDIANA UNIV., IN
item Sloop, K - ELI LILLY, IN
item Bidwell, J - INDIANA UNIV., IN
item Rhodes, S - PURDUE UNIV., IN

Submitted to: Gene
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: April 22, 2004
Publication Date: October 5, 2004
Citation: Guy, J.C., Hunter, C.S., Showalter, A.A., Smith, T.P., Charoonpatrapong, K., Sloop, K.W., Bidwell, J.P., Rhodes, S.J. 2004. Conserved amino acid sequences confer nuclear localization upon the prophet of Pit-1 pituitary transcription factor protein. Gene. 336:263-273.

Interpretive Summary: The anterior pituitary gland of mammals plays an important role in regulating physiological pathways controlling growth, reproduction, metabolism, and stress response. A protein known as PROP1 is essential for the proper development of this gland, for example human patients with defects in PROP1 display various diseases such as delayed puberty or growth abnormalities. Our previous studies have identified and characterized a similar protein in cattle. The study reported here extends the study to sheep, and shows that the structure of the gene is different than that seen in cattle. The manuscript documents these differences and demonstrates the distinct functions of different parts of the protein. One region of the protein is shown to direct localization to the nucleus of the cell, and the new data reveal that interference with this step by mutation of the protein may be one of the causes of pituitary hormone deficiency.

Technical Abstract: The anterior pituitary gland of mammals plays an important role in regulating physiological pathways controlling growth, reproduction, metabolism, and stress response. A protein known as PROP1 is essential for the proper development of this gland, for example human patients with defects in PROP1 display various diseases such as delayed puberty or growth abnormalities. Our previous studies have identified and characterized a similar protein in cattle. The study reported here extends the study to sheep, and shows that the structure of the gene is different than that seen in cattle. The manuscript documents these differences and demonstrates the distinct functions of different parts of the protein. One region of the protein is shown to direct localization to the nucleus of the cell, and the new data reveal that interference with this step by mutation of the protein may be one of the causes of pituitary hormone deficiency.

Last Modified: 7/22/2014
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