Page Banner

United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Population Analysis of Enterococci Isolated from Poultry Sources

Authors
item Debnam, Antoinette - UNIV OF GEORGIA
item Jackson, Charlene
item Hofacre, Charles - UNIV OF GEORGIA

Submitted to: Georgia Academy of Sciences Meeting
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: January 5, 2004
Publication Date: March 26, 2004
Citation: Debnam, A.L., Jackson, C.R., Hofacre, C.L. 2004. Population analysis of enterococci isolated from poultry sources. Georgia Academy of Sciences Meeting. 62(1):41-42.

Interpretive Summary: The potential for transfer of antimicrobial resistant bacteria from animals to humans is cause for concern. Commensal bacteria such as enterococci may be reservoirs of resistance, thus it is important to characterize the strains isolated from animals and their environments. This study analyzed enterococci from three different poultry farms. Two houses on each farm were control houses and did not use any antimicrobials while two other houses on each farm used antimicrobials. Litter, chick boxliners, feed, and poultry carcasses were obtained from each house and cultured for the presence of enterococci. Enterococcus faecalis (1303/3487; 37.4%) and E. faecium (1155/3487; 33.1%) were isolated most often from all farms and houses regardless of antimicrobial treatment. Higher numbers of E. faecalis were isolated from untreated houses (728/1794; 40.6%) than from treated houses (575/1693; 33.9%). In contrast, less E. faecium were isolated from untreated houses (576/1794; 32.1%) than from treated houses (579/1693; 34.2%).

Technical Abstract: The potential for transfer of antimicrobial resistant bacteria from animals to humans is cause for concern. Commensal bacteria such as enterococci may be reservoirs of resistance, thus it is important to characterize the strains isolated from animals and their environments. This study analyzed enterococci from three different poultry farms. Two houses on each farm were control houses and did not use any antimicrobials while two other houses on each farm used antimicrobials. Litter, chick boxliners, feed, and poultry carcasses were obtained from each house and cultured for the presence of enterococci. Enterococcus faecalis (1303/3487; 37.4%) and E. faecium (1155/3487; 33.1%) were isolated most often from all farms and houses regardless of antimicrobial treatment. Higher numbers of E. faecalis were isolated from untreated houses (728/1794; 40.6%) than from treated houses (575/1693; 33.9%). In contrast, less E. faecium were isolated from untreated houses (576/1794; 32.1%) than from treated houses (579/1693; 34.2%).

Last Modified: 9/21/2014