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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: 2004 High Plains Groundwater Resources: Challenges and Opportunities

Authors
item Rainwater, Ken - TTU
item Zobeck, Teddy

Submitted to: Meeting Proceedings
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: December 7, 2004
Publication Date: December 7, 2004
Citation: Rainwater, K., Zobeck, T.M. 2004. High Plains Groundwater Resources: Challenges and Opportunities. Proceedings of 2004 High Plains Groundwater Resources: Challenges and Opportunities, December 7-9, 2004, Lubbock, Texas. 2004 CDROM.

Interpretive Summary: Groundwater resources are critical to sustainable development in the High Plains of Texas. The Ogallala Aquifer is our largest source of water with an estimated 417 million acre-feet of water in Texas. Since the Texas High Plains generated an estimated combined annual economic value of crops and livestock of $5.6 billion and this production is highly dependent on the Ogallala, we have great incentive to conserve this valuable resource. This conference is a public education forum and research symposium. The first day will present general educational topics and include an address by Texas Agriculture Commissioner Susan Combs. The second day will include another half day of general educations topic addressing issues such as the rule of capture, regional water planning, and water conservation from urban and agricultural perspectives. The conference will also include 58 technical papers addressing issues of hydrogeology/hydrology, groundwater quality, remediation, and modeling, municipal water supply, plant irrigation and water use, alternative cropping, agricultural economic and legal issues. This book contains papers presented during the conference.

Technical Abstract: Groundwater resources are critical to sustainable development in the High Plains of Texas. The Ogallala Aquifer is our largest source of water with an estimated 417 million acre-feet of water in Texas. Since the Texas High Plains generated an estimated combined annual economic value of crops and livestock of $5.6 billion and this production is highly dependent on the Ogallala, we have great incentive to conserve this valuable resource. West Texas has had a long history of studying and holding conferences to address the use of High Plains groundwater resources. The Ogallala Aquifer Symposium I, The Ogallala Aquifer Symposium II, and the Play Basin Symposium were held in 1974, 1984, and 1994, respectively. The 2004 conference is a public education forum and research symposium. The first day will present general educational topics and include an address by Texas Agriculture Commissioner Susan Combs. The second day will include another half day of general educations topic addressing issues such as the rule of capture, regional water planning, and water conservation from urban and agricultural perspectives. The conference will also include 58 technical papers addressing issues of hydrogeology/hydrology, groundwater quality, remediation, and modeling, municipal water supply, plant irrigation and water use, alternative cropping, agricultural economic and legal issues. This manuscript contains papers submitted for presentation during the conference.

Last Modified: 4/19/2014
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