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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: CATFISH GENETICS, BREEDING, AND PHYSIOLOGY

Location: Warmwater Aquaculture Research Unit

Title: CHANNEL CATFISH VIRUS DISEASE AND NWAC103 CATFISH

Authors
item Tucker, C - MISS. STATE UNIV.
item Silverstein, Peter
item Camus, A - MISS. STATE UNIV.
item BOURGEOIS, LANIE
item Wise, D - MISS. STATE UNIV.
item WALDBIESER, GEOFFREY

Submitted to: The Catfish Journal
Publication Type: Trade Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: January 5, 2005
Publication Date: January 7, 2005
Citation: Tucker, C., Silverstein, P.S., Camus, A., Bilodeau, A.L., Wise, D., Waldbieser, G.C. 2005. Channel catfish virus disease and NWAC103 catfish. The Catfish Journal 19(5):8.

Interpretive Summary: In early summer of 2004, extensive losses of NWAC103 channel catfish sac fry and early swim-up fry were documented on a large fingerling farm in the Delta region of Mississippi and losses were attributed to channel catfish virus disease (CCVD). Catfish from the eight strains were compared with NWAC103 fish for susceptibility to CCV infection. NWAC103 channel catfish were neither the most resistant nor the most susceptible fish tested. We also found that the virus isolated from fish on the farm that experienced the large losses described above was more lethal than the laboratory-archived reference ('type') strain of channel catfish virus that has been used in previous research. Factors other than strain of fish and virus may also be involved in the large losses on the farm in question, although in retrospect these factors may be impossible to determine. It is critically important to remember, however, that CCVD affects only juvenile fish and the disease is not an issue for foodfish growers. Fingerlings purchased in fall or winter will not be affected by CCVD during subsequent growout, regardless of their past history. The NWAC103 catfish strain is one of the fastest-growing fish available to foodfish growers and has a valuable place in the catfish industry.

Technical Abstract: In early summer of 2004, extensive losses of NWAC103 channel catfish sac fry and early swim-up fry were documented on a large fingerling farm in the Delta region of Mississippi and losses were attributed to channel catfish virus disease (CCVD). Catfish from the eight strains were compared with NWAC103 fish for susceptibility to CCV infection. NWAC103 channel catfish were neither the most resistant nor the most susceptible fish tested. We also found that the virus isolated from fish on the farm that experienced the large losses described above was more lethal than the laboratory-archived reference ('type') strain of channel catfish virus that has been used in previous research. Factors other than strain of fish and virus may also be involved in the large losses on the farm in question, although in retrospect these factors may be impossible to determine. It is critically important to remember, however, that CCVD affects only juvenile fish and the disease is not an issue for foodfish growers. Fingerlings purchased in fall or winter will not be affected by CCVD during subsequent growout, regardless of their past history. The NWAC103 catfish strain is one of the fastest-growing fish available to foodfish growers and has a valuable place in the catfish industry.

Last Modified: 8/27/2014