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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Simple sequence repeat marker associated with a natural leaf defoliation trait in tetraploid cotton

Authors
item Abdurakhmonov, I - INST GENET EXPT BIOLOGY
item Abdullaev, A - INST GENET EXPT BIOLOGY
item Saha, Sukumar
item Buriev, Z - INST GENET EXPT BIOLOGY
item Kuryazov, Z - INST GENET EXPT BIOLOGY
item Arslanov, D - INST GENET EXPT BIOLOGY
item Mavlonov, G - INST GENET EXPT BIOLOGY
item Rizaeva, S - INST GENET EXPT BIOLOGY
item Reddy, U - W. VIRGINIA STATE UNIV
item Jenkins, Johnie

Submitted to: Journal of Heredity
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: May 12, 2005
Publication Date: September 13, 2005
Citation: Abdurakhmonov, I.Y., Abdullaev, A.A., Saha, S., Buriev, Z.T., Arslanov, D., Kuryazov, Mavlonov, G., Rizaeva, S.M., Reddy, U.K., Jenkins, J.N., Abdullaev, A., Abdukarimov, A. 2005. Simple sequence repeat marker associated with a natural leaf defoliation trait in tetraploid cotton. Journal of Heredity. 96:644-653.

Interpretive Summary: Cotton, (Gossypium hirsutum L.), leaf defoliation has a significant ecological and economical impact in cotton production. Leaf defoliation enhances and speeds boll opening, accelerates the harvesting time, improves fiber grades, and oftentimes reduces boll rot. Commonly used defoliating chemicals are very costly and potentially can be hazardous to the environment through accumulation of biohazardous chemicals in the soil, and pollution of drinking water. One of the approaches to overcome these challenges in cotton defoliation is the development of natural leaf defoliating cotton lines through introgression of the trait in certain diploid Gossypium species. Understanding the genetic inheritance of the natural leaf defoliation trait and identification of linked DNA markers will expedite the introgression of this important trait. Our results revealed from segregating F2 population analysis for the natural leaf defoliation trait that this trait is controlled by both cytoplasmic and nuclear interaction. Results showed that JESPR-178 showed significant linkage to a leaf defoliation QTL with a LOD score of 3.64 explaining about 22.4% of the variation of the trait in the segregating F2 population. Based on deletion analysis with chromosome substitution lines JESPR-178 was located on the short arm of chromosome 18, suggesting indirectly that gene(s) associated with natural leaf defoliating might be located on this chromosome. This microsatellite marker may have potential for use in cotton marker assisted selection (MAS) programs for natural leaf defoliation.

Technical Abstract: Cotton, (Gossypium hirsutum L.), leaf defoliation has a significant ecological and economical impact in cotton production. Hence, the utilization of a natural leaf defoliation trait, which exists in wild diploid cotton species, in the development of tetraploid cultivated cotton will not only be cost-effective, but also facilitate production of very high-grade fiber. The primary goal of our research was to tag loci associated with natural leaf defoliation using microsatellite markers in Upland cotton. The F2 populations developed from reciprocal crosses between the two parental cotton lines, AN-Boyovut-2, wild type, and Listopad Beliy, a natural leaf defoliating type, suggested that the natural leaf defoliation trait is controlled by both cytoplasmic and nuclear interaction. Results from the Kruskal-Wallis non-parametric test revealed that JESPR-178, JESPR-13, JESPR-153, JESPR-56, and TMHC-05 are significantly (KW=13.453, 9.974, 6.171, 3.160 and 3.238, respectively) associated with natural leaf defoliation in the mapping population. Further, in interval mapping JESPR-178 showed significant linkage to a leaf defoliation QTL with a LOD score of 3.64 that explained 22.4% of the variation in the trait. JESPR-178 was assigned to the short arm of chromosome 18, suggesting indirectly that gene(s) associated with natural leaf defoliating might be located on this chromosome. This microsatellite marker may have potential for use in cotton marker assisted selection (MAS) programs for natural leaf defoliation.

Last Modified: 11/21/2014
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