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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Control of White Mold of Dry Beans with Foliar Sprays in Jerome County, Id, 2004

Authors
item Strausbaugh, Carl
item Koehn, A - UNIVERSITY OF IDAHO

Submitted to: Fungicide and Nematocide Tests
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: December 30, 2004
Publication Date: April 1, 2005
Citation: Strausbaugh, C.A., Koehn, A.C. 2005. Control of white mold of dry beans with foliar sprays in Jerome County, ID, 2004. Fungicide and Nematode Tests. 60:FC075. Available: http:/www.apsnet.org/online.

Interpretive Summary: White mold of beans is a serious fungal disease of dry beans in the United States. White mold can result in pod and stem infections which have the potential to significantly reducing bean quality and yield. Since little or no resistance to white mold exists in commercial cultivars, the primary means of disease control is the use foliar fungicides and cultural practices. In an effort to identify fungicides with acceptable efficacy, we evaluated eight foliar fungicide treatments and an untreated check based on natural infection. There was very little natural disease pressure making it difficult to establish differences between treatments. Based on previous years data we would have expected most of the treatments to have reduced disease incidence and severity. The trends in these data support these previous observations.

Technical Abstract: Foliar sprays were evaluated for control of white mold of dry beans in Jerome County, ID. Eight foliar treatments and an untreated check were evaluated for control of white mold using the dry bean cultivar Etna. Experimental units were arranged in a randomized complete block design with four replications. Plants were evaluated for disease incidence and severity and yield. There was very little natural disease pressure making it difficult to establish differences between treatments. Based on previous years data we would have expected most of the treatments to have reduced disease incidence and severity. The trends in these data support these previous observations. No phytotoxicity was observed.

Last Modified: 4/16/2014
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