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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Managing Yaupon with Prescribed Fire and Herbicides in the Texas Post Oak Savannah

Authors
item Mitchell, Robert
item Cathey, James - TEXAS A&M UNI
item Dabbert, Brad - TEXAS TECH UNI
item Prochaska, Dale - TX PARKS & WILDLIFE
item Dupree, Stephanie - TEXAS TECH UNI
item Sosebee, Ron - TEXAS TECH UNI

Submitted to: Rangelands
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: March 17, 2005
Publication Date: October 1, 2005
Citation: Mitchell, R., Cathey, J.C., Dabbert, B., Prochaska, D., Dupree, S., Sosebee, R. 2005. Managing yaupon with prescribed fire and herbicides in the texas post oak savannah. Rangelands 27(5):17-19.

Interpretive Summary: Increased yaupon density reduces the livestock grazing potential and wildlife habitat quality in the Texas Post Oak Savannah. Restriction of fires and poor grazing management are largely responsible for the increase in yaupon. We investigated the impact of different herbicide treatments on yaupon plants that had sprouted after burning. Studies were conducted on sites that had been burned either 6 or 18 months before herbicide application. All treatments resulted in high yaupon mortality, indicating yaupon is easily controlled with low concentrations of herbicide after prescribed burning. Efforts to control yaupon and restore the native plant and animal communities of the Post Oak Savannah with fire also will require the use of herbicides.

Technical Abstract: Yaupon (Ilex vomitoria) density has increased in the Post Oak Savannah Ecological Region of Texas. Restriction of fires and poor grazing management are largely responsible for the increase in yaupon. Herbicides have been used to effectively manage yaupon. However, little information is available for treatment options that incorporate prescribed burning. We investigated the impact of diesel and diesel combined with different concentrations of Garlon 4 (triclopyr: 3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridinyloxyacetic acid, butoxyethyl ester) on yaupon plants that had sprouted 6 and 18 months after burning. Studies were conducted on sites that had been burned either 6 or 18 months before herbicide application. Yaupon sprouted vigorously after burning, and all treatments containing Garlon 4 resulted in at least 92% mortality. Yaupon is easily controlled with low concentrations of herbicide after prescribed burning. It appears that individual plant treatments of Garlon 4 applied 6 months after burning are slightly more effective than waiting to apply herbicides 18 months after burning. Management efforts to reduce yaupon density and restore the flora and fauna of the Post Oak Savannah with prescribed fire also will require the use of herbicides.

Last Modified: 10/1/2014
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