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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: The USDA Conservation Effects Assessment Project: Research in the Fort Cobb Reservoir Watershed

Authors
item Steiner, Jean
item Starks, Patrick
item Van Liew, Michael
item Daniel, John
item Ramming, M - OK CONSERVATION COMM
item Phillips, S - OK CONSERVATION COMM
item Matlock, K - USDA-NRCS
item Freeland, R - USDA-NRCS
item Adams, J - USDA-NRCS

Submitted to: Meeting Proceedings
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: September 20, 2004
Publication Date: November 18, 2004
Citation: Steiner, J.L., Starks, P.J., Van Liew, M.W., Daniel, J.A., Ramming, M., Phillips, S., Matlock, K., Freeland, R., Adams, J. 2004. The USDA Conservation Effects Assessment Project: Research in the Fort Cobb Reservoir Watershed. In: Proceedings of the Oklahoma Water 2004 Conference, November 18-19, 2004, Stillwater, Oklahoma. 2003&2004 CDROM.

Interpretive Summary: The 2002 Farm Bill authorized expenditures about 80% greater than the 1996 Farm Bill to support conservation practices on U.S. farms and ranches and mandated better environmental accountability for conservation programs. The Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) and Agricultural Research Service (ARS) are leading the Conservation Effects Assessment Project (CEAP) to quantify environmental effects of USDA conservation programs. CEAP has two major components: a National Assessment and Watershed Assessments. Under the latter, watershed-scale research will be conducted on 12 ARS Benchmark Watersheds, including the Fort Cobb watershed in southwestern Oklahoma. Fort Cobb Reservoir provides public water supply, fishing, boating, and wildlife habitat. The Fort Cobb Water Quality Project was established by the Oklahoma Conservation Commission in 2001 through an Environmental Protection Agency Clean Water Act Section 319 grant to address environmental concerns in the watershed, including sediments and nutrients from agriculture, gully erosion, channel instability in some tributaries, sediment from unpaved roads and oil and gas exploration, and nutrients from septic systems. Mixed agricultural land use includes rainfed and irrigated cropland, rangeland, pastureland, and forested riparian areas. Conservation practices include pasture and hay planting, terraces, grassed waterways, fencing, grade stabilization structures, and critical area planting. A collaborative team will analyze linkages of conservation practices, soil properties, edge-of-field and watershed-scale responses. Comprehensive analysis of environmental, social, and economic benefits that accrue from implementing conservation will benefit those responsible for conservation policy and conservation program management.

Technical Abstract: The 2002 Farm Bill authorized expenditures about 80% greater than the 1996 Farm Bill to support conservation practices on U.S. farms and ranches and mandated better environmental accountability for conservation programs. The Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) and Agricultural Research Service (ARS) are leading the Conservation Effects Assessment Project (CEAP) to quantify environmental effects of USDA conservation programs. CEAP has two major components: a National Assessment and Watershed Assessments. Under the latter, watershed-scale research will be conducted on 12 ARS Benchmark Watersheds, including the Fort Cobb watershed in southwestern Oklahoma. Fort Cobb Reservoir provides public water supply, fishing, boating, and wildlife habitat. The Fort Cobb Water Quality Project was established by the Oklahoma Conservation Commission in 2001 through an Environmental Protection Agency Clean Water Act Section 319 grant to address environmental concerns in the watershed, including sediments and nutrients from agriculture, gully erosion, channel instability in some tributaries, sediment from unpaved roads and oil and gas exploration, and nutrients from septic systems. Mixed agricultural land use includes rainfed and irrigated cropland, rangeland, pastureland, and forested riparian areas. Conservation practices include pasture and hay planting, terraces, grassed waterways, fencing, grade stabilization structures, and critical area planting. A collaborative team will analyze linkages of conservation practices, soil properties, edge-of-field and watershed-scale responses. Comprehensive analysis of environmental, social, and economic benefits that accrue from implementing conservation will benefit those responsible for conservation policy and conservation program management.

Last Modified: 11/28/2014
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