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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: SURVIVAL OF FOUR ACCESSIONS OF ANIGOZANTHOS MANGLESII (HAEMODORACEAE) SEEDS FOLLOWING EXPOSURE TO LIQUID NITROGEN

Authors
item Merritt, D - KINGS PARK & BOTANIC GARD
item Touchell, D - MICHIGAN TECH UNIV
item Senaratna, K - KINGS PARK & BOTANIC GARD
item Dixon, K - KINGS PARK & BOTANIC GARD
item Walters, Christina

Submitted to: CryoLetters
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: March 27, 2005
Publication Date: July 1, 2005
Citation: Merritt, D.J., Touchell, D.H., Senaratna, T., Dixon, K.W., Walters, C. 2005. Survival of four accessions of Anigozanthos manglesii (Haemodoraceae) seeds following exposure to liquid nitrogen. CryoLetters 26:121-130.

Interpretive Summary: National genebanks around the world have been established to preserve genetic resources of legacy plant species. The species investigated in this report is Anigozanthos manglesii, which is endemic to Western Australia. The seeds of this species have some unusual characteristics, including lipids that melt at relatively high temperatures and a requirement for heating before germination. None-the-less, the seeds are amenable to cryopreservation, showing little damage if dried sufficiently to limit freezing but not excessively.

Technical Abstract: This study investigated the survival of seeds from the prominent endemic Western Australian species Anigozanthos manglesii following exposure to liquid nitrogen (cryostorage). Seeds from four different accessions (collected in 1987, 1990, 1993 and 1998) adjusted to different water contents were tested for survival following cryostorage. Water content was a significant determining factor with survival of cryostored seeds declining rapidly at water contents above c. 18%. These water contents were deemed as critical water contents and were supported by DSC scans showing endothermic peaks indicating ice crystallisation. In some instances, survival of cryostored seeds also declined at low water contents indicating possible desiccation-related damage. Seeds from 1990 had a lower than expected survival compared to the other accessions. This could be attributed to the higher lipid content of seeds from this accession, as well as the reduced germination and vigour of these seeds prior to cryostorage. Thus, seed quality should be determined prior to liquid nitrogen storage.

Last Modified: 9/1/2014
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