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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Release of Belmineb-Rmr-8, -9, -10, -11, -12, and -13 Erect, Short Vine, Rust and Mosaic Resistant Great Northern Bean Germplasm Lines

Authors
item PASTOR CORRALES, MARCIAL
item Stavely, J - USDA, RETIRED
item Kelly, James - MICHIGAN STATE UNIV
item Steadman, James - UNIV OF NEBRASKA
item Coyne, Dermot - DECEASED
item Lindgreen, Dale - UNIV OF NEBRASKA

Submitted to: Germplasm Release
Publication Type: Germplasm Release
Publication Acceptance Date: October 5, 2004
Publication Date: October 5, 2004
Citation: Pastor-Corrales, M.A., Stavely, J.R., Kelly, J. D., Steadman, J.R., Coyne, D.P., and Lindgren, D.T. 2004. Release of BelMineb-RMR-8, -9, -10, -11, -12, and -13 Erect. Short Vine, Rust and Mosaic Resistant Great Northern Bean Germplasm Lines. U.S. Dept. of Agric., Michigan Agricultural Experiment Station and University of Nebraska Agricultural Research Division. Germplasm Release Notice. 4 p.

Interpretive Summary: The common bean is susceptible to many diseases that reduce seed and pod yields of dry and snap beans. Genetic disease resistance is the most economic and practical approach to control bean diseases. The ARS-USDA Vegetable Laboratory at Beltsville, MD, in collaboration with the Michigan Experiment Station and the University of Nebraska Agricultural Research Division developed and released in 2004, six great northern bean germplasm lines that are unique in the world for their genetic resistance to diseases. These bean lines, known as BelMiNeb-RMR-8, -9, -10, -11, -12, and -13, are the first and only great northern beans with four genes for resistance to all known strains of the hyper-variable rust pathogen. Additionally, they have two other genes that make them resistant to all the strains of the bean common mosaic and bean common mosaic necrosis viruses. Rust and bean common mosaic are economically important and often deadly diseases of dry and snap beans in the United States and other parts of the world. Scientists, particularly plant breeders from universities, experiment stations, and private industry will benefit from these cultivars when they use them to improve their local cultivars. Scientists from at least 12 countries, including the United States, have already requested seed of these beans for use in their bean improvement programs. The common bean is the most important food legume in the world and a significant source of protein, complex carbohydrates, iron, folate and fiber to millions of people in developed and developing countries.

Technical Abstract: Great northern common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) germplasm lines BelMiNeb (BMN)-Rust and Mosaic Resistant (RMR)-8, -9, -10, -11, -12, and -13 were developed by the ARS-USDA Vegetable Laboratory at Beltsville, MD, in collaboration with the Michigan Experiment Station and the University of Nebraska Agricultural Research Division. These high yielding, upright short vine, type II, white seeded, great northern dry bean germplasm lines are the first and only great northern bean lines to combine four genes for resistance to the bean rust pathogen, Uromyces appendiculatus, with two genes for resistance to the viruses bean common mosaic (BCMV) and bean common mosaic necrosis (BCMNV). These bean lines combine the Ur-6 with Ur-3, Ur-4, and Ur-11 rust resistance genes and the bc-3 and I genes for resistance to BCMV and BCMNV. BelMiNeb-RMR-8, -9, -10, -11, -12, and -13 are homozygous for all their rust and mosaic resistance genes. The Ur-3 and Ur-11 genes are from beans of the Middle American gene pool while Ur-4 and Ur-6 are from beans of the Andean gene pool. These genes provide resistance to all 90 races of the bean rust pathogen that have been identified and maintained at Beltsville, MD, and to all known strains of BCMV and BCMNV. The rust resistance was confirmed by inoculation under greenhouse conditions with eight selected races of U. appendiculatus that produce well proven and characteristic reactions in bean plants that have the Ur-3, Ur-4, Ur-6, and Ur-11 genes. Mosaic resistance was confirmed from inoculation with BCMV strains NL4 and or US 5, and BCMNV strain NL3. Presence of the I gene was reconfirmed by using molecular markers tightly linked to the I gene

Last Modified: 8/27/2014
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