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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: How Will Leaf Respiration Respond to Growth under Elevated Carbon Dioxide Concentration in Three Diverse Tree Canopies?

Authors
item Leakey, Andrew - UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS
item Davey, Phillip - UNIVERSITY OF ESSEX
item Allen, Damian - RESEARCH TRAIANGLE PARK
item Rogers, Alistair - BROOKHAVEN LABORATORY
item Delucia, Evan - UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS
item Drake, Bert - SMITHSONIAN RES. CENTER
item Murthy, Ramesh - Columbia University
item Ort, Donald
item Long, Stephen - UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS

Submitted to: Ecological Society of America Abstracts
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: October 15, 2003
Publication Date: October 20, 2004
Citation: Leakey, A., Davey, P., Allen, D., Rogers, A., Delucia, E., Drake, B., Murthy, R., Ort, D.R., Long, S.P. 2004. How Will Leaf Respiration Respond To Growth Under Elevated Carbon Dioxide Concentration In Three Diverse Tree Canopies [abstract]? Ecological Society of America Abstracts. Available: http://abstracts.co.allenpress.com/pweb/esa2003/document/?ID=25515

Technical Abstract: Terrestrial plant respiration is a large component of the global carbon cycle, releasing 10 times more carbon per annum than fossil fuel combustion. Some previous studies have shown an inhibition of leaf mitochondrial respiration under future elevated carbon dioxide concentration ([CO2]) (-18%), which would be sufficient to increase sequestration of carbon into biomass and partially offset rising atmospheric [CO2]. However, the nature of the direct and indirect responses of respiration to growth at elevated [CO2] remains contentious. We used high-resolution differential oxygen analysis to assess respiration without the potential experimental artifacts arising from traditional infra-red gas analysis of [CO2] flux. We present data on the following diverse experimental forest canopies that have developed under elevated [CO2] in the field: Pinus taeda at FACTS-1, Duke Forest, NC; Populus deltoides at Biosphere 2, AZ; and Quercus myrtifolia & Quercus geminata at the Smithsonian open-top chamber facility, FL. We found: (A) no direct effect of elevated [CO2] on respiration in any species at any time, but; (B) variation between 0 - 23% greater respiration after long-term growth at elevated [CO2]. Further data is presented assessing rates of respiration in canopies grown at elevated [CO2] in relation to leaf photosynthetic, carbohydrate and nitrogen status.

Last Modified: 9/10/2014
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