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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Growth and Nutrient Uptake of Mangosteen Grown under Shade Levels

Authors
item Goenaga, Ricardo
item Rivera Amador, Edmundo

Submitted to: Journal of Agriculture of the University of Puerto Rico
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: March 8, 2005
Publication Date: July 8, 2005
Citation: Goenaga, R.J., Rivera, E. 2005. Growth and nutrient uptake of mangosteen grown under shade Levels. Journal of Agriculture of the University of Puerto Rico. 89:149-158.

Interpretive Summary: Mangosteen is a tropical fruit of attractive shape, color and excellent flavor. It has great economic potential and is often referred to as "Queen of Fruits" or "the finest fruit of the world." A major limitation to the development of a mangosteen industry is the long pre-bearing stage (8-15 years) that seedlings take to bear fruits for the first time. A study was undertaken to determine the effects of various shade and fertilizer treatments on growth of young mangosteen plants. It was found that plants grown under 50% shade and supplied with nine grams of a 15-11-13 (N-P205-K20) commercial fertilizer accumulated significantly more dry matter, had thicker stems, grew taller and developed a larger leaf area. The recommendations made in this study are highly transferable and will be used by Extension Specialists and commercial nurseries.

Technical Abstract: Mangosteen is a tropical fruit with great economic potential. The major impediment to the development of a mangosteen industry is the long pre-bearing stage that seedlings take to produce fruits. There is little information regarding optimum nursery practices to enhance growth and development of mangosteen seedlings. Two experiments were conducted to determine the effect of various shade and fertilizer treatments on growth of young mangosteen plants. Each experiment lasted 22 months from transplanting to harvest. Seedlings were grown under 0, 30, 50, 70 and 90% artificial shade and received 3, 6, and 9 g per pot of a 15-4.8-10.8% (N-P-K) commercial fertilizer mixture at 3, 8 and 15 months after planting. Plants grown under 50% shade and supplied with 9 g of fertilizer accumulated significantly more dry matter, had thicker stems, grew taller and developed a larger leaf area. Plants grown under full sunlight grew little or died.

Last Modified: 12/21/2014
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