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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: The Effects of Flooding on Snap Bean Yield.

Author
item Reed, Stewart

Submitted to: American Society of Agronomy Meetings
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: September 1, 2004
Publication Date: October 30, 2004
Citation: Reed, S.T.,K. Jayachandran, C. Carey-Holmes, and M.R. Savabi. 2004. The effects of flooding on snap bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) yield. 2004 American Society of Agronomy Meetings. Seattle, WA.

Interpretive Summary: Crop production in humid climates can be limited by flooded or waterlogged soil. Flooding, over a one to five day time span, can reduce yields below that necessary for an economic return on an investment. In a greenhouse study, snap bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) flooded for different durations and at different growth stages, resulted in the equation: Yield = 12.75299 + 0.0001873 x leaf area in cm2 - 0.52579 x flood duration in days - 0.58056 x the number of days after planting the flood occurred + 3.41206 x pod count. This paper reports results from field tests of the relationships between flood duration, flood timing and snap bean yield. The study consisted of one, two, three, five and seven day flood durations at either the two leaf or four leaf growth stage. In general leaf area and dry weight decreased as flood duration increased. Plants flooded at the four leaf stage had a greater leaf loss and a higher mortality rate than those flooded at the two leaf stage. Field data fit the predicted model with an R2 = 0.9788. To apply this model we suggest recording the DAP standing water first appears in a field and the number of days standing water persists. Seven to 14 d after flood water subsides, determine leaf area per plant and estimate pod count from the number of developing pods and open flower per plant. This model gives an estimate of yield values below which a producer would add no additional inputs.

Technical Abstract: Crop production in humid climates can be limited by flooded or waterlogged soil. Flooding, over a one to five day time span, can reduce yields below that necessary for an economic return on an investment. In a greenhouse study, snap bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) flooded for different durations and at different growth stages, resulted in the equation: Yield = 12.75299 + 0.0001873 x leaf area in cm2 - 0.52579 x flood duration in days - 0.58056 x the number of days after planting the flood occurred + 3.41206 x pod count. This paper reports results from field tests of the relationships between flood duration, flood timing and snap bean yield. The study consisted of one, two, three, five and seven day flood durations at either the two leaf or four leaf growth stage. In general leaf area and dry weight decreased as flood duration increased. Plants flooded at the four leaf stage had a greater leaf loss and a higher mortality rate than those flooded at the two leaf stage. Field data fit the predicted model with an R2 = 0.9788. To apply this model we suggest recording the DAP standing water first appears in a field and the number of days standing water persists. Seven to 14 d after flood water subsides, determine leaf area per plant and estimate pod count from the number of developing pods and open flower per plant. This model gives an estimate of yield values below which a producer would add no additional inputs.

Last Modified: 10/23/2014
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