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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Interation of Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi with Bean Plants under Flooded Conditions.

Author
item REED, STEWART

Submitted to: American Society of Agronomy Meetings
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: September 1, 2004
Publication Date: October 30, 2004
Citation: Sah, S., Reed, S.T., K. Jayachandran, and S. Mendiola-Quadreny. 2004. Interation of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi with bean plants under flooded conditions. 2004 American Society of Agronomy Meetings. Seattle, WA.

Interpretive Summary: Flooding is a common problem that affects crop production in South Florida. Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi (AMF) are well known for several benefits to hundreds of crop plants including green bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.). Our objective is to study the interactions between AMF and green bean under flooded conditions and evaluate the benefits derived by green bean plants. A greenhouse experiment was conducted to determine the tolerance of green bean to flooding at different growth stages. A native AMF culture, a commercial AMF inoculum and uninoculated controls were set-up in a randomized block design with three replications. The inoculum was mixed 5 cm below the surface and green bean seeds were planted 2.5 cm above the inoculum. Watering and fertilization occurred daily. During the study, plants were subjected to flooding for 8 hours every seven days. Plants were harvested 31, 41 and 50 days after planting. Plant height, plant biomass, root architecture, mycorrhizal colonization, total carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus were measured. Statistical analysis was conducted using the General Linear Model of SAS. Further studies are in progress to understand the role of AMF under flooded conditions.

Technical Abstract: Flooding is a common problem that affects crop production in South Florida. Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi (AMF) are well known for several benefits to hundreds of crop plants including green bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.). Our objective is to study the interactions between AMF and green bean under flooded conditions and evaluate the benefits derived by green bean plants. A greenhouse experiment was conducted to determine the tolerance of green bean to flooding at different growth stages. A native AMF culture, a commercial AMF inoculum and uninoculated controls were set-up in a randomized block design with three replications. The inoculum was mixed 5 cm below the surface and green bean seeds were planted 2.5 cm above the inoculum. Watering and fertilization occurred daily. During the study, plants were subjected to flooding for 8 hours every seven days. Plants were harvested 31, 41 and 50 days after planting. Plant height, plant biomass, root architecture, mycorrhizal colonization, total carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus were measured. Statistical analysis was conducted using the General Linear Model of SAS. Further studies are in progress to understand the role of AMF under flooded conditions.

Last Modified: 7/28/2014
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