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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: RISKS OF INTERBREEDING BETWEEN SPECIES USED IN BIOLOGICAL CONTROL AND NATIVE SPECIES AND METHODS FOR EVALUATING ITS OCCURRENCE AND IMPACT

Authors
item Hopper, Keith
item Britch, Seth
item Wajnberg, Eric - INRA, ANTIBES, FRANCE

Submitted to: Environmental Impact of Invertebrates for Biological Control of Arthropods: Methods and Risk Assessment
Publication Type: Book / Chapter
Publication Acceptance Date: April 15, 2005
Publication Date: January 20, 2006
Citation: Hopper, K.R., Britch, S.C., Wajnberg, E. 2006. Risks of interbreeding between species used in biological control and native species and methods for evaluating its occurrence and impact. Pp. 78-97 D. Babendreier, F. Bigler and U. Kuhlmann, eds. Environmental Impact of Invertebrates for Biological Control of Arthropods: Methods and Risk Assessment. CABI Biosciences, London.

Interpretive Summary: Although biological control is generally an effective and safe method of pest management, insect species introduced or augmented for biological control of insect pests may interbreed with native species, which may change fitness or cause evolution, which may in turn alter abundances. We review the literature on factors affecting the likelihood of interbreeding between insect species and the impacts when these occur. We concentrate on the risks from introduced species, but we also address the risks from augmentation of native species. We propose methods for pre-introduction or pre-augmentation assessment of the likelihood and potential impact of interbreeding between native species and insects used in biological control. Finally, we propose methods for evaluating the occurrence and impact of interbreeding after insect species are introduced or augmented. The risks of large impacts from interbreeding between insects used in biological control and other species is very small. But data are lacking so more research is needed.

Technical Abstract: Insect species introduced or augmented for biological control of insect pests may interbreed with native species, which may change fitness or cause evolution, which may in turn alter abundances. By 'interbreeding', we mean any reproductive interactions between species. We review the literature on factors affecting the likelihood of interbreeding between insect species and the impacts when these occur. We discuss phylogenetic relatedness, geographical distribution, spatial and temporal barriers to mating, mate recognition, copulation and sperm use, hybrid inviability and sterility, hybrid speciation, reproductive character displacement, and introgression. We concentrate on the risks from introduced species, but we also address the risks from augmentation of native species. We propose methods for pre-introduction or pre-augmentation assessment of the likelihood and potential impact of interbreeding between native species and insects used in biological control. Finally, we propose methods for evaluating the occurrence and impact of interbreeding after insect species are introduced or augmented.

Last Modified: 10/31/2014
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