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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: A Novel Method to Induce Oviposition of the Glassy-Winged Sharpshooter, Homalodisca Coagulata (Hemiptera: Auchenorryncha: Cicadellidae)

Authors
item Tipping, C - UNIV. OF FLORIDA
item Mizell, R - UNIV. OF FLORIDA
item Andersen, P - UNIV. OF FLORIDA
item Hunter, Wayne
item Lopez-Gutierreze, E - UNIV. OF FLORIDA

Submitted to: Journal of Entomological Science
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: March 5, 2005
Publication Date: March 5, 2005
Citation: Tipping, C., Mizell, R., Andersen, P.C., Hunter, W.B., Lopez-Gutierreze, E.R. 2005. A novel method to induce oviposition of the glassy-winged sharpshooter, Homalodisca coagulata (Hemiptera: Auchenorryncha: Cicadellidae). Journal of Entomological Science. 40(2):246-249.

Interpretive Summary: Often research efforts are hindered by the difficulty to mass rear insects. To aid research efforts on the main vector of Pierce's Disease of grapes, Homalodisca coagulata, the glassy-winged sharpshooter, a method was developed to induce females to lay eggs as needed. Egg bearing Homalodisca coagulata females were induced into egg laying a significantly greater number of eggs 24h after a desiccation treatment with a directed flow of warm air (40°C, 5.0 meters per second) for 15 minutes, more than untreated females. Treated females laid almost twice as many eggs as untreated females 54.5% to 28.2% respectively, regardless of host plant. Use of induced oviposition will aid studies currently examining sharpshooter development. Funding towards completion of this research came from the California Department of Food and Agriculture; and the University of California, Davis. Contribution of the Florida Agricultural Experiment Station Journal Series number R-10335.

Technical Abstract: Research on the main vector of Pierce's Disease of grapes, Homalodisca coagulata, the glassy-winged sharpshooter, is often hindered by lack of the supply of leafhoppers or their eggs. To solve this problem, gravid Homalodisca coagulata females were induced into ovipositing a significantly greater proportion of their eggs 24h after a desiccation treatment with a directed flow of warm air (40°C, 5.0 meters per second) for 15 m than untreated females. Treated and untreated females oviposited 54.5% and 28.2% of their eggs, respectively, regardless of host plant. Use of induced oviposition will aid studies currently examining sharpshooter development. The California Department of Food and Agriculture; and the University of California, Davis provided funding towards this research. Contribution of the Florida Agricultural Experiment Station Journal Series number R-10335.

Last Modified: 12/20/2014
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