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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Tuberculosis: A Reemerging Disease at the Interface of Domestic Animals and Wildlife

Author
item Palmer, Mitchell

Submitted to: Book Chapter
Publication Type: Book / Chapter
Publication Acceptance Date: June 30, 2005
Publication Date: October 1, 2007
Citation: Palmer, M.V. 2007. Tuberculosis: A Reemerging Disease at the Interface of Domestic Animals and Wildlife. In: Childs, J.E., Mackenzie, J.S., Richt, J.A., editors. Wildlife and Emerging Zoonotic Diseases: The Biology, Circumstances and Consequences of Cross-Species Transmission. New York, NY: Springer. p. 195-215.

Interpretive Summary: Complex interactions involving humans, domestic animals and wildlife create environments favorable to the emergence of new diseases. Today, reservoirs of Mycobacterium bovis, the causative agent of tuberculosis in animals and a serious disease communicable to humans, exist in wildlife. The presence of these wildlife reservoirs is the direct result of spill-over from domestic livestock, human factors such as translocation of wildlife, supplemental feeding of wildlife and wildlife populations reaching densities beyond normal habitat carrying capacities due to human intervention. As many countries attempt to eliminate M. bovis from domestic livestock, efforts are impeded by spill-back from wildlife reservoirs. It will not be possible to eliminate M. bovis from livestock until transmission between wildlife and domestic animals is halted. Such an endeavor will require a collaborative effort between agricultural, wildlife, environmental and political interests.

Technical Abstract: Complex interactions involving humans, domestic animals and wildlife create environments favorable to the emergence of new diseases. Today, reservoirs of Mycobacterium bovis, the causative agent of tuberculosis in animals and a serious zoonosis, exist in wildlife. The presence of these wildlife reservoirs is the direct result of spill-over from domestic livestock, anthropogenic factors such as translocation of wildlife, supplemental feeding of wildlife and wildlife populations reaching densities beyond normal habitat carrying capacities due to human intervention. As many countries attempt to eradicate M. bovis from domestic livestock, efforts are impeded by spill-back from wildlife reservoirs. It will not be possible to eradicate M. bovis from livestock until transmission between wildlife and domestic animals is halted. Such an endeavor will require a collaborative effort between agricultural, wildlife, environmental and political interests.

Last Modified: 10/24/2014
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