Page Banner

United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Application of Electrochemical Immunonsensor Technology to Pollution Monitoring in the Nairobi River

Authors
item Robinson, M - U. OF NEWCASTLE UPON TYNE
item Mcneil, C - U. OF NEWCASTLE UPON TYNE
item Weber, C - GSF NRCEH
item Kramer, P - GSF NRCEH
item Stanker, Larry

Submitted to: Meeting Proceedings
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: May 24, 2004
Publication Date: May 26, 2004
Citation: Robinson, M.J., McNeil, C.J., Weber, C-M., Kramer, P.M., Stanker, L.H. 2004. Application of electrochemical immunonsensor technology to pollution monitoring in the Nairobi River. 8th World Congress on Biosensors Proceedings. P2.4.12.

Interpretive Summary: Drinking and bathing water in developing countries can be a major source of infection. For this reason the World Health Organization has set regulatory measures to prevent exposure. These regulatory measures focus on piped water systems for urban areas. Results are presented here from a European Union-funded study on pollution monitoring in Africa (Aqua-Screen). A biosensor was adapted for measurement of pyrethroid and DDT pesticides in water samples from the Nairobi River. Results suggested that the biosensor compared well with a conventional test and could measure contamination in 15 minutes compared to 110 minutes for the conventional test.

Technical Abstract: Drinking and bathing are a major source of infections in developing countries. For the provision of safe drinking water to the majority of the population, the World Health Organization has set regulatory measures to prevent contaminated water being consumed by people. However, these regulatory measures are only enforced in piped water systems for urban areas. This poster presents data from an EC-funded study on pollution monitoring in Africa (Aqua-Screen). A previously described enzyme channeling separation-free electrochemical immunosensor method has been adapted for measurement of pyrethroid and DDT pesticides in water samples from the Nairobi river. The electrochemical immunosensor method incorporates disposable screen-printed carbon-based enzyme electrodes as the detector element in conjunction with single use pesticide immuno-membranes. Anti-pesticide antibodies were immobilized onto membranes, which in turn, are interfaced with the sensor surface. The assay is based on competition for available glucose oxidase (GOs) conjugates. The method has had to be adapted and applied to water samples from the Nairobi River which include the determination and elimination of potential matrix effects of this water.

Last Modified: 7/12/2014