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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Transported Sediment in Comparison with Channel Bed Material in Low-Order Alluvial Channels 1666

Authors
item Nichols, Mary
item Canfield, Howard
item Yuill, B. - ARIZONA STATE UNIVERSITY
item Schmeeckle, M. - ARIZONA STATE UNIVERSITY

Submitted to: American Geophysical Union
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: October 18, 2004
Publication Date: December 16, 2004
Citation: Nichols, M.H., Canfield, H.E., Yuill, B.T., Schmeeckle, M. 2004. Transported sediment in comparison with channel bed material in low-order alluvial channels. [Abstract]. EOS Trans. AGU, 85(47), Fall Meet. Suppl., Abstract 4513.

Interpretive Summary: Sediment transported in alluvial channels consists of mobilized channel bed material combined with that detached from channel banks and sediment contributed through overland flow. Unconsolidated bed material provides an almost limitless sediment source. Although the particle distributions of the bed material and the transported sediment are often assumed to be the same, few dataset are available to test this assumption. Detailed measurements of channel geometry, bed material, and spatial patterns of coarse particle distribution were made on a low-order channel within the USDA-ARS Walnut Gulch Experimental Watershed. Sediment transported during the 2002 monsoon season was collected with a traversing slot sediment sampler and a pit trap. Particles size distributions of channel bed sediment are compared with the particle distributions of sediment collected during flash-flows. Initial results indicate that the bed material contains less fine sediment than the transported load, and sediment particles larger than 4 mm make up as much as 15% of the total sediment load transported during the measured events.

Technical Abstract: Sediment transported in alluvial channels consists of mobilized channel bed material combined with that detached from channel banks and sediment contributed through overland flow. Unconsolidated bed material provides an almost limitless sediment source. Although the particle distributions of the bed material and the transported sediment are often assumed to be the same, few dataset are available to test this assumption. Detailed measurements of channel geometry, bed material, and spatial patterns of coarse particle distribution were made on a low-order channel within the USDA-ARS Walnut Gulch Experimental Watershed. Sediment transported during the 2002 monsoon season was collected with a traversing slot sediment sampler and a pit trap. Particles size distributions of channel bed sediment are compared with the particle distributions of sediment collected during flash-flows. Initial results indicate that the bed material contains less fine sediment than the transported load, and sediment particles larger than 4 mm make up as much as 15% of the total sediment load transported during the measured events.

Last Modified: 8/29/2014
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