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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Enhancing Aquatic System Quality Through Integrated Riparian Zone and Crop Management in a Pacific Northwest Landscape

Authors
item Griffith, Stephen
item Steiner, Jeffrey

Submitted to: American Water Resources Association Conference Proceedings
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: February 28, 2004
Publication Date: June 28, 2004
Citation: Griffith, S.M., Steiner, J.J. 2004. Enhancing aquatic system quality through integrated riparian zone and crop management in a Pacific Northwest landscape. In: Proceedings of the American Water Resources Association Summer Specialty Conference, June 28-30, 2004, Middleburg, Virginia. 2004 CD-ROM.

Interpretive Summary: Common to the Pacific Northwest States are waterways bearing fish and other aquatic species listed under the Federal Endangered Species Act. This legislation impacts 96, 95, 72, and 65% of the land areas in Idaho, Washington, Oregon, and northern California, respectively. Grass-seed and other grass-based systems constitute a significant portion of the regional landscape. Because this is an ecologically diverse region, one-size-fits-all solutions will not provide the optimal site-specific configurations of agricultural and conservation practices needed to assure the greatest farm economic return while meeting legislation standards for clean water and wildlife habitat quality. We are beginning to understand how cropping practices, riparian zones, and aquatic systems together function and not only mitigate agricultural chemical and sediment, but also enhance natural resource quality. This paper discusses how we are combing what we know of natural physical and biological process and are combining this with our current knowledge of the impacts of perennial grass seed cropping and conservation practices to enhance water and aquatic wildlife habitat quality.

Technical Abstract: Common to the Pacific Northwest States are waterways bearing fish and other aquatic species listed under the Federal Endangered Species Act. This legislation impacts 96, 95, 72, and 65% of the land areas in Idaho, Washington, Oregon, and northern California, respectively. Grass-seed and other grass-based systems constitute a significant portion of the regional landscape. Because this is an ecologically diverse region, one-size-fits-all solutions will not provide the optimal site-specific configurations of agricultural and conservation practices needed to assure the greatest farm economic return while meeting legislation standards for clean water and wildlife habitat quality. We are beginning to understand how cropping practices, riparian zones, and aquatic systems together function and not only mitigate agricultural chemical and sediment, but also enhance natural resource quality. This paper discusses how we are combing what we know of natural physical and biological process and are combining this with our current knowledge of the impacts of perennial grass seed cropping and conservation practices to enhance water and aquatic wildlife habitat quality.

Last Modified: 8/22/2014