Page Banner

United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: First Report of Soybean Dwarf Virus on Soybean in Wisconsin

Authors
item Phibbs, Anette - UNIV OF WISCONSIN
item Barta, Adrian - UNIV OF WISCONSIN
item Domier, Leslie

Submitted to: Plant Disease
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: August 19, 2004
Publication Date: November 15, 2004
Citation: Phibbs, A., Barta, A., Domier, L.L. 2004. First Report of Soybean Dwarf Virus on Soybean in Wisconsin. Plant Disease. 88:1285.

Interpretive Summary: Soybean dwarf virus (SbDV) causes widespread economic losses on soybean in Japan. Even though SbDV is common in clovers growing next to soybean fields in the US, SbDV rarely infects soybean plants in the US. The inability of the SbDV to move from clovers to soybeans has been attributed to the absence of aphid vectors that colonize soybeans and have the ability to transmit the virus. In 2003, 286 soybean fields in Wisconsin were surveyed for SbDV. Plants from five fields in four Wisconsin counties (Columbia, Lafayette, Sauk and Waushara) tested positive for SbDV by two independent detection methods. All SbDV-infected samples were collected from fields that were heavily infested with soybean aphids, which were first identified in the US in 2000. Although soybean aphids were present, the ability of the soybean aphids to transmit SbDV was not tested. The information in this paper should be useful to other scientists who are studying the epidemiology and distribution of SbDV.

Technical Abstract: Soybean dwarf virus (SbDV) causes widespread economic losses on soybeans (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) in Japan and has been reported on soybeans in Virginia. In 2003, 286 soybean fields in the R2-R4 growth stage were surveyed for SbDV in Wisconsin. Plants from five fields in four Wisconsin counties (Columbia, Lafayette, Sauk and Waushara) tested positive for SbDV by double antibody sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (DAS ELISA). The presence of SbDV was confirmed and strain identity was inferred by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT PCR). The size of the RT-PCR products (110 bp) was consistent with the dwarfing strain of SbDV. All locations that tested positive for SbDV had soybean aphids (Aphis glycines Matsumura) on 100% of soybean plants. Although aphids were present, vector relations in the Wisconsin infections are unclear at this time. This is the first report of SbDV infecting soybean in Wisconsin.

Last Modified: 12/28/2014
Footer Content Back to Top of Page