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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: The Effects of Short and Long Term Exposure to Endophyte Infected Tall Fescue Seed on Serum, Fecal and Urine Concentrations of Ergovaline and Lysergic Acid in Mature Gelding Horses

Authors
item Schultz, Carrie
item Londge-Ivey, Shanna - NEW MEXICO STATE UNI
item Bush, Lowell - UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY
item Craig, Morrie - OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY
item Strickland, James

Submitted to: International Grasslands Congress
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: August 30, 2004
Publication Date: June 1, 2005
Citation: Schultz, C., Londge-Ivey, S., Bush, L., Craig, M., Strickland, J.R. 2005. The effects of short and long term exposure to endophyte infected tall fescue seed on serum, fecal and urine concentrations of ergovaline and lysergic acid in mature gelding horses. International Grasslands Congress. F.P. O'Mara et al (ed). P. 308. Wageningen Academic Publishers.

Interpretive Summary: Introduction: Approximately 33 million acres of tall fescue, a cool-season grass commonly used for forage and turf purpose, are grown in the United States. Despite its good nutritive value, consumption by livestock results in a decrease in both reproductive and growth performance due to ergot alkaloids produced by an endophytic fungus. Little research has investigated the metabolic fate of ergot alkaloids and/or their metabolites in grazing horses. The objectives of this experiment were: a.) to determine concentrations of ergovaline (EV) and lysergic acid (LA) in the feces and urine of geldings exposed to endophyte-infected tall fescue seed over a time course experiment and b.) to measure the effects of alkaloid-containing tall fescue on nutrient digestibility and serum clinical enzyme profiles.

Technical Abstract: Introduction Approximately 33 million acres of tall fescue, a cool-season grass commonly used for forage and turf purposes (Sleeper and Buckner, 1995), are grown in the United States. Despite its good nutritive value, consumption by livestock results in a decrease in both reproductive and growth performance due to ergot alkaloids produced by an endophytic fungus. Little research has investigated the metabolic fate of ergot alkaloids and/or their metabolites in grazing horses. The objectives of this experiment were: a.) to determine concentrations of ergovaline (EV) and lysergic acid (LA) in the feces and urine of geldings exposed to endophyte-infected tall fescue seed over a time course experiment and b.) to measure the effects of alkaloid-containing tall fescue on nutrient digestibility and serum clinical enzyme profiles.

Last Modified: 11/23/2014
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