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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Current Status of Methyl Bromide Alternatives Research in Florida

Author
item Burelle, Nancy

Submitted to: Nematropica
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: October 1, 2004
Publication Date: October 1, 2004
Citation: Kokalis-Burelle, N. 2004. Current status of methyl bromide alternatives research in Florida. Nematropica. 32(2):112-113.

Technical Abstract: Since 1993, extensive research on alternatives to methyl bromide has been conducted in Florida at USDA, ARS and the University of Florida in cooperation with growers and industry. Although alternative fumigants have proven efficacious for certain pests, no single registered chemical is effective as a nematicide, fungicide, and herbicide. Currently, the best available chemical alternative for most of Florida is Telone C-35 (a combination of 1,3-D and chloropicrin) and an appropriate crop specific herbicide or combination of herbicides. However, use of 1,3-D is problematic in some Florida regions where risk of contamination to surface and groundwater supplies exist. Use of methyl bromide alternatives will require growers to monitor pest populations and employ appropriate combinations of tactics. Progress has been made in developing pest thresholds, population monitoring, and integrated crop management strategies for assessing pest control needs. Fumigant emissions continue to be reduced with VIF films, new formulations, bed size reduction, alternate year applications, and drip application. Cultural, physical, biological, and biorational inputs have shown potential as components in integrated crop management strategies. Although research on methyl bromide alternatives has not yet produced a drop-in replacement fumigant, it has resulted in innovative methods and strategies for chemical control of many soilborne pests, and significantly contributed to development of more sustainable production practices through a greater understanding of pest biology and soil ecology.

Last Modified: 10/22/2014
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