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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Effect of Water Stress on Rooting Depth of Field Pea, Garbanzo Bean and Soybean in Eastern Colorado

Authors
item Benjamin, Joseph
item Nielsen, David

Submitted to: Agronomy Abstracts
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: July 1, 2003
Publication Date: November 2, 2003
Citation: Benjamin, J.G., Nielsen, D.C. 2003. Effect of water stress on rooting depth of field pea, garbanzo bean and soybean in eastern colorado. Agronomy Abstracts. Presented at the (ASA-CSSA-SSSA)American Society of Agronomy Meetings. Nov. 2-5, 2003. Denver, CO.

Technical Abstract: Cropping diversity in the central Great Plains could be improved if suitable legumes were found to include in rotations. Better knowledge of legume root system response to water stress may lead to a better understanding of which legumes are suited to this region and how to include them in rotation with other crops. We collected soil samples to determine rooting depth and root surface area distribution of chickpea, field pea, and soybean grown under dryland and irrigated conditions at mid bloom and mid pod set growth stages. Chickpea and field pea root density and depth did not change between the mid bloom growth stage and the mid pod set growth stage, while soybean root density increased between these growth stages. Chickpea responded to less water availability by growing a greater proportion of its roots deeper in the soil. Water availability had no effect on field pea root distributions. Soybean grew more roots deeper in the soil profile with wetter soil conditions. Soil bulk density had little effect on chickpea root area density near the soil surface. Greater bulk density resulted in lower root area density in field pea and soybean. Root area density response to soil bulk density was greater later in the growing season and under irrigated conditions. We speculate that the rooting characteristics of chickpea and field pea make these species more suitable than soybean for pulse production under dryland conditions in the central Great Plains.

Last Modified: 12/18/2014
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