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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Notice of Release of 17 Germplasm Lines of Upland (Gossypium Hirsutum) Cotton, Each with a Different Pair of G. Barbadense Chromosomes Or Arms Substituted for the Respective G. Hirsutum Chromosomes Or Arms

Authors
item Stelly, D - TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY
item Raska, W - TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY
item Saha, Sukumar
item Jenkins, Johnie
item McCarty, Jack
item Gutierrez, Osman

Submitted to: Germplasm Release
Publication Type: Germplasm Release
Publication Acceptance Date: May 11, 2004
Publication Date: May 11, 2004
Citation: Stelly, D.M., Raska, W., Jenkins, J.N., McCarty, J.C., Gutierrez, O.A. Notice of release of 17 germplasm lines of upland (Gossypium hirsutum) cotton, each with a different pair of G. barbadense chromosomes or arms substituted for the respective G. hirsutum chromosomes or arms. Official Release of USDA, ARS and Mississippi Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station, 5/04/04.

Interpretive Summary: None required for Germplasm Release

Technical Abstract: The Texas Agricultural Experiment Station, the Agricultural Research Service of the United States Department of Agriculture, and the Mississippi Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station announce the release of 17 germplasm lines of backcrossed chromosome substitution lines of Gossypium barbadense in G. hirsutum. This material forms a unique set of germplasm lines which are genetically similar except that each differs by the replacement of a specific homologous pair of chromosomes or chromosome segments from 3-79 (G. barbadense) into TM-1 upland cotton (G. hirsutum). These germplasm lines are being released because attempts to incorporate genes from G. barbadense for exceptional fiber length, strength, fineness, and other traits into upland have generally not achieved stable introgression of desired genes. The utility of these lines is that when they are crossed with upland only one pair of G. barbadense chromosomes will be segregating. This should greatly improve the introgression of desired genes.

Last Modified: 4/18/2014
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