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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Goal Setting Is Differentially Related to Change in Fruit, Juice, and Vegetable Consumption among Fourth-Grade Children.

Authors
item Cullen, Karen
item Zakeri, Issa
item Pryor, Erin - CHILDREN'S HOSPITL DENVER
item Baranowski, Thomas
item Baranowski, Janice
item Watson, Kathy - BAYLOR COLLEGE OF MED

Submitted to: Health Education and Behavior
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: December 1, 2003
Publication Date: April 1, 2004
Citation: Cullen, K., Zakeri, I., Pryor, E.W., Baranowski, T., Baranowski, J., Watson, K. 2004. Goal setting is differentially related to change in fruit, juice, and vegetable consumption among fourth-grade children. Health Education and Behavior. 31(2):258-69.

Interpretive Summary: This study measured whether setting goals to eat more fruit and vegetables in a computer game helped 4th grade children eat more fruit, 100% juice, and vegetables. The students were given goals related to increasing fruit, juice, and vegetable consumption at each of the 8 sessions, and filled out records of what they ate for four days before and after playing the game. For students with low baseline fruit-juice preferences, completing more fruit-juice goals resulted in higher fruit-juice consumption. Among those with low baseline vegetable consumption, completing one vegetable goal was related to higher post vegetable consumption. This is one of the first reports that goal attainment was somewhat effective in promoting dietary change among children.

Technical Abstract: The impact of goal attainment in a dietary change program to increase fruit, 100% juice, and vegetable consumption was assessed among fourth-grade students. At each session, the students were given goals related to increasing fruit, juice, and vegetable consumption. Baseline consumption and postconsumption were assessed with up to 4 days of computerized dietary recalls. Analyses included regression models predicting postconsumption from the numbers of fruit-juice goals, vegetable goals, or total number of general goals attained, respectively. For students with low baseline fruit-juice preferences, attaining more fruit-juice goals resulted in increased post-fruit-juice consumption. Among those with low baseline vegetable consumption, attaining one vegetable goal was related to higher post-vegetable consumption. For boys and those with high baseline fruit, juice, and vegetable consumption, attaining three general goals was related to increased fruit, juice, and vegetable intake. The results show that goal attainment was somewhat effective in promoting dietary change among children.

Last Modified: 10/21/2014